The eponymy game

I love a good bit of unintentional levity. One of my favorite discoveries is when an interviewee -- one of our own or even in another publication -- has a name that fits their field just a little too well. Now, call me a suspicious Aloysius, but when it happens twice in a week, in the same publication, I start getting wary. Today Jane Brody for the __New York Times__ writes on the linkurl:important exercises;http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/19/health/19brody.html for maintaining health in aging

Brendan Maher
Dec 18, 2006
I love a good bit of unintentional levity. One of my favorite discoveries is when an interviewee -- one of our own or even in another publication -- has a name that fits their field just a little too well. Now, call me a suspicious Aloysius, but when it happens twice in a week, in the same publication, I start getting wary. Today Jane Brody for the __New York Times__ writes on the linkurl:important exercises;http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/19/health/19brody.html for maintaining health in aging baby boomers. A key source warns that unless one does "something to slow the deterioration in muscle, bone strength and agility that naturally accompanies aging," he or she will become a prime candidate for, "boomeritis." The source: Nicholas A. DiNubile, an orthopedic surgeon at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Last week, a major news splash on the linkurl:effectiveness of circumcision;http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/14/health/14hiv.html in reducing the risk of HIV transmission hit...

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