The science of storytelling

Science is a story -- a story about ideas, but also a story about the remarkable people who devote their lives to unraveling the wonders of nature. Scientists themselves, however, rarely have a vessel to impart their personal wisdoms since the main outlet for scientific research -- peer-reviewed literature -- is typically devoid of narrative. Not so last Friday (June 12) night at the linkurl:World Science Festival;http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/ in New York City. Two Nobel Laureates, two n

Elie Dolgin
Jun 17, 2009
Science is a story -- a story about ideas, but also a story about the remarkable people who devote their lives to unraveling the wonders of nature. Scientists themselves, however, rarely have a vessel to impart their personal wisdoms since the main outlet for scientific research -- peer-reviewed literature -- is typically devoid of narrative. Not so last Friday (June 12) night at the linkurl:World Science Festival;http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/ in New York City. Two Nobel Laureates, two neurobiologists, and two writers poured their hearts out to a packed room of showgoers at an event called__ linkurl:Matter: Stories of Atoms and Eves,;http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/2009/matter __which was sponsored by linkurl:The Moth,;http://www.themoth.org/ a nonprofit group that hosts storytelling slams. In keeping with The Moth's traditions, each story of the event had to be true, short, and told without notes. "It was quite the effort trying to get a 40 minute presentation into 10 minutes," linkurl:Irene Pepperberg,;http://www.brandeis.edu/facguide/person.html?emplid=2d3923e829d95e3849ac8001f5c5fa254b5cf400 who...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to more than 35 years of archives, as well as TS Digest, digital editions of The Scientist, feature stories, and much more!
Already a member?