The State of the Science Union

President Bush thinks that science is the key to keeping the US ahead. It will help the country wean itself off fossil fuels, he said in his fifth linkurl:State of the Union;http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2002/01/20020129-11.html last night, and it will keep the nation?s businesses competitive in the global marketplace. He wants to start with children, whom he?d like to see ?take more math and science and to make sure those courses are rigorous enough to compete with other nations.? Pre

Ivan Oransky
Jan 31, 2006
President Bush thinks that science is the key to keeping the US ahead. It will help the country wean itself off fossil fuels, he said in his fifth linkurl:State of the Union;http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2002/01/20020129-11.html last night, and it will keep the nation?s businesses competitive in the global marketplace. He wants to start with children, whom he?d like to see ?take more math and science and to make sure those courses are rigorous enough to compete with other nations.? Presumably, that leaves little room for intelligent design in science class, which he linkurl:nearly endorsed;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/85/ several months ago? But before life scientists get too excited, it?s worth noting that according to his address, the physical sciences matter much more than the life sciences ? twice as much, in fact. Bush proposed doubling ?the federal commitment to the most critical basic research programs in the physical sciences over the next 10 years.? Such funding, he...

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