Top 7 cell biology papers

#1 Gene for autoimmunity Rare genetic variants in the protein sialic acid acetylesterase (SASE) are linked to common human autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, arthritis, and Crohn's disease. In mice, defects in the protein have been linked to problems in B-cell signaling and the development of auto-antibodies. I. Surolia, et al., "Functionally defective germline variants of sialic acid acetylesterase in autoimmunity," Nature, 466:243-7. Epub 2010 Jun 16. linkurl:Eval;http://f1000b

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef (an unusual nickname for Jennifer) got her master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses. After four years of diving off the Gulf...

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Jul 12, 2010
#1 Gene for autoimmunity Rare genetic variants in the protein sialic acid acetylesterase (SASE) are linked to common human autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, arthritis, and Crohn's disease. In mice, defects in the protein have been linked to problems in B-cell signaling and the development of auto-antibodies. I. Surolia, et al., "Functionally defective germline variants of sialic acid acetylesterase in autoimmunity," Nature, 466:243-7. Epub 2010 Jun 16. linkurl:Eval;http://f1000biology.com/article/id/3611960 by Mark Anderson, UCSF Diabetes Center; Anthony DeFranco, University of California, San Francisco; Takeshi Tsubata, Tokyo Medical University, Japan.
Mouse cingulate cortex neurons
Image: Wikimedia commons,
Shushruth
#2 Cell mobility illuminated Using light to activate a the protein Rac in a single cell, researchers show how the protein can induce a group of epithelial cells to polarize en masse, suggesting that these cells can sense movement as a group. X. Wang, et al., "Light-mediated activation reveals a key role for...
#3 How the brain communicatesH. Adesnik and M. Scanziani. "Lateral competition for cortical space by layer-specific horizontal circuits," Nature, 464:1155-60, 2010. linkurl:Eval;http://f1000biology.com/article/id/3125964 by Aguan Wei and Jan-Marino Ramirez, University of Washington; James Cottam and Michael Hausser, University College London. #4 Backwards-working neurons V. Chevaleyre and SA Siegelbaum. "Strong CA2 pyramidal neuron synapses define a powerful disynaptic cortico-hippocampal loop," Neuron, 66:560-72, 2010. linkurl:Eval;http://f1000biology.com/article/id/3514956 byStephen M Fitzjohn and Graham Collingridge, MRC centre for Synaptic Plasticity; Johannes Hell, University of California, Davis. #5 Cell-swallowing proteinsWM Henne, et al., " FCHo proteins are nucleators of clathrin-mediated endocytosis," Science, 328:1281-4, 2010. linkurl:Eval;http://f1000biology.com/article/id/3501956 by Martin Lowe, University of Manchester; Pekka Lappalainen, Institute of Biotechnology, Finland. #6 Less genetic "dark matter" H van Bakel et al., "Most 'dark matter' transcripts are associated with known genes," PLoS Biol, 2010 May 18;8(5):e1000371. linkurl:Eval;http://f1000biology.com/article/id/3374960 by Daniel Reines, Emory University School of Medicine; Adnane Sellam and Andre Nantel, National Reseasrch Council of Canada. #7 Death receptor helps cancer liveL. Chen et al., "CD95 promotes tumour growth," Nature, 465:492-6, 2010. linkurl:Eval;http://f1000biology.com/article/id/3406957 by Sharad Kumar, Centre for Cancer Biology, Austrailia; Astar Winoto, University of California, Berkeley. Jennifer Welsh contributed to this article.



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