Top 7 hidden jewels

#1 Malfunctioning microtubules Disruption to cellular microtubules during development had the surprising result of increasing the mechanical stiffness of frog embryos, leading to morphological defects and suggesting microtubules play an even more crucial role in cell movement and shape. J. Zhou, et al., "Macroscopic stiffening of embryonic tissues via microtubules, RhoGEF and the assembly of contractile bundles of actomyosin," Development, 137(16):2785-94, 2010. linkurl:Eval by;http://f1000bio

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef Akst is managing editor of The Scientist, where she started as an intern in 2009 after receiving a master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses.

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Aug 2, 2010
#1 Malfunctioning microtubules Disruption to cellular microtubules during development had the surprising result of increasing the mechanical stiffness of frog embryos, leading to morphological defects and suggesting microtubules play an even more crucial role in cell movement and shape. J. Zhou, et al., "Macroscopic stiffening of embryonic tissues via microtubules, RhoGEF and the assembly of contractile bundles of actomyosin," Development, 137(16):2785-94, 2010. linkurl:Eval by;http://f1000biology.com/article/9630s7k8g6tmq7c/id/4234956/evaluation/sections John Wallingford, University of Texas at Austin. #2 Crucial carbon compounds
Image of the mitotic spindle in a human cell
showing microtubules in green, chromosomes
in blue, and kinetochores in red.

Image: Wikimedia commons,
Afunguy
By analyzing genes expressed by a coastal ocean bacterial community, the authors identify compounds that may be critical to the flow of organic carbon in the seawater and provide a novel way to study the function of marine bacteria in global carbon cycling. R.S. Poretsky, et al., "Transporter genes expressed...
#3 Say no to natural drugsV. Dancík, et al., "Distinct biological network properties between the targets of natural products and disease genes," J Am Chem Soc, 132(27):9259-61, 2010. linkurl:Eval by;http://f1000biology.com/article/v21jt371mkpw63p/id/4055956/evaluation/sections David Triggle, SUNY at Buffalo. #4 How muscles growY. Sun, et al., "Mammalian target of rapamycin regulates miRNA-1 and follistatin in skeletal myogenesis," J Cell Biol, 189(7):1157-69, 2010. linkurl:Eval by;http://f1000biology.com/article/lq2hxmk2r6hzkx1/id/4198956/evaluation/sections Denis Guttridge, Ohio State University. #5 Animal extremists pose riskD.L. Ringach and J.D. Jentsch, "We must face the threats," J Neurosci, 29(37):11417-8, 2009. linkurl:Eval by;http://f1000biology.com/article/1z85byf2f5tjjrd/id/1164890/evaluation/sections Matteo Carandini, University College London, S. Murray Sherman, University of Chicago, et al. (17 evaluators). #6 Nameless flowersL.N. Joppa, et al., "How many species of flowering plants are there?" Proc Biol Sci, Epub 2010 Jul 7. linkurl:Eval by;http://f1000biology.com/article/1v5wgyvp6hvv5nv/id/4183956/evaluation/sections Navjot Sodhi, National University of Singapore. #7 Most important plant patentsX. Yin and Z.J. Zhang, "Recent patents on plant transgenic technology," Recent Pat Biotechnol, 4(2):98-111, 2010. linkurl:Eval by;http://f1000biology.com/article/qw250lfd9h2vmgy/id/4216956/evaluation/sections Ramon Serrano, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia-CSIC, Spain.




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