Menu

Trouble at the CDC?

Anonymous letters to The Lancet point to problems with the CDC's Center for Global Health, but the agency denies the allegations.

Mar 12, 2012
Bob Grant

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS, DANIEL MAYER

Three anonymous letters detailing alleged problems at a global health division run by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provoked a rebuttal from CDC officials.

Allegations in the letters, excerpts of which were published in The Lancet within the last month and aimed at the CDC's 18-month-old Center for Global Health, range from general low morale amongst staffers at the center to misappropriation of funds and clashing with the US Agency for International Development programs. One of the three letters calls for an "objective evaluation" of the global health division, and the other two propose that a Congressional investigation be initiated.

The Lancet editor, Richard Horton, is defending the journal's publication of the letters, saying they are exhortations from CDC staffers whose concerns were stifled by the agency. The letters, he wrote in one of the pieces that excerpts them, "raise questions about leadership, management of resources, proper use of the CDC's authority and power, and the scientific rigor of CDC research."

CDC Director Thomas Frieden and Center for Global Health Director Kevin De Cock, responded in a letter published in The Lancet last week, stating that the allegations of waste and especially suppression of opposing viewpoints are absurd. "We're committed as a scientific agency to open debate," De Cock told ScienceInsider. "I'm committed to that."

De Cock conceded that his center could use some improvement. "We don't claim to be a perfect organization," he told ScienceInsider. But he and Frieden point out in their letter that the program has made strides in helping developing countries fight health emergencies and in training field epidemiologists.

November 2018

Intelligent Science

Wrapping our heads around human smarts

Marketplace

Sponsored Product Updates

Slice® Safety Cutters for Lab Work

Slice® Safety Cutters for Lab Work

Slice cutting tools—which feature our patent-pending safety blades—meet many lab-specific requirements. Our scalpels and craft knives are well suited for delicate work, and our utility knives are good for general use.

The Lab of the Future: Alinity Poised to Reinvent Clinical Diagnostic Testing and Help Improve Healthcare

The Lab of the Future: Alinity Poised to Reinvent Clinical Diagnostic Testing and Help Improve Healthcare

Every minute counts when waiting for accurate diagnostic test results to guide critical care decisions, making today's clinical lab more important than ever. In fact, nearly 70 percent of critical care decisions are driven by a diagnostic test.

LGC announces new, integrated, global portfolio brand, Biosearch Technologies, representing genomic tools for mission critical customer applications

LGC announces new, integrated, global portfolio brand, Biosearch Technologies, representing genomic tools for mission critical customer applications

LGC’s Genomics division announced it is transforming its branding under LGC, Biosearch Technologies, a unified portfolio brand integrating optimised genomic analysis technologies and tools to accelerate scientific outcomes.