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TS Picks: March 13, 2015

Incidental cancer diagnoses; sound pollution and marine life; the upside of self-promotion

Tracy Vence

WIKIMEDIA, CALLE EKLUND/V-WOLF

Selections from The Scientist’s reading list:

  • More than two dozen women who purchased Sequenom’s MaterniT21 PLUS noninvasive prenatal testing service have found out they have cancer as a result of having their blood screened, BuzzFeed News reported this week. While such incidental findings are commonly encountered in medical practice, purveyors of noninvasive prenatal testing services are in largely uncharted territory. “When it comes to prenatal tests, however, it’s not clear whether incidental findings have clear-cut diagnostic value,” BuzzFeed noted.
     
  • “Opening the U.S. east coast to seismic airgun exploration poses an unacceptable risk of serious harm to marine life at the species and population levels, the full extent of which will not be understood until long after the harm occurs,” Cornell University’s Christopher Clark and dozens of his colleagues wrote in a letter to President Barack Obama, requesting that he reconsider the US Department of the...

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