Watching wisdom

As young assistant professors in the Harvard biology department of the 1950s and 60s, the eminent biologists linkurl:James Watson;http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_D._Watson and linkurl:Edward O. Wilson;http://www.eowilson.org/ famously didn't get along, to say the least. Wilson once called Watson "the most unpleasant human being I have ever met." Watson, in turn, dismissed Wilson as little more than a "stamp collector." Over the past few decades, the two have made amends, and that rapprochemen

Elie Dolgin
Jun 11, 2009
As young assistant professors in the Harvard biology department of the 1950s and 60s, the eminent biologists linkurl:James Watson;http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_D._Watson and linkurl:Edward O. Wilson;http://www.eowilson.org/ famously didn't get along, to say the least. Wilson once called Watson "the most unpleasant human being I have ever met." Watson, in turn, dismissed Wilson as little more than a "stamp collector." Over the past few decades, the two have made amends, and that rapprochement came to a dramatic climax last night (June 11) at the linkurl:World Science Festival;http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/ in New York City. MacArthur-winning actress and playwright linkurl:Anna Deavere Smith;http://www.annadeaveresmithworks.org/ reenacted interviews she had conducted with the two researchers, in her piece entitled "Watching Wilson and Watson," and she breathed into her performance all the genius, humanity, and brutal honesty that exemplifies these two luminaries of the natural sciences. "It was a big deal to get a chance to meet what you in science...




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