Week in Review: July 4–8

Mitochondrial, nuclear DNA mismatch benefits; oil gland may assist swimming swordfish; buggy software and fMRI results; Zika updates; is MIMIVIRE like CRISPR?

Jul 8, 2016
Tracy Vence

CRISPR-like?

Is a giant virus’s MIMIVIRE really analogous to bacteria’s CRISPR-Cas? Some virologists question that claim, which was first published in March. 

DNA mismatch

Mice bred to have mitochondrial and nuclear genomes from different strains appeared to remain healthy longer into their lives than wild-type animals, researchers reported, noting the results could have implications for mitochondrial replacement therapy.

Speedy swimmers

A newly discovered gland at the base of the swordfish head may provide lubrication, allowing the animals to swim at high speeds, scientists proposed.

Faulty fMRI statistics

Commonly used statistical software for functional MRI data analysis produces a high false-positive rate, scientists have shown, calling the results of tens of thousands of studies into question.

Young hominin

Homo naledi may have live more recently than first thought, according to a new analysis.

Studying Olympians

The US National Institutes of Health is funding the University of Utah’s Carrie Byinton and colleagues to study Zika infections and their consequences among athletes, coaches, and staff attending the upcoming Olympics in Brazil.