Wii-hab

In 2006, researcher linkurl:Marsha Melnick;http://www.therapeuticassociates.com/locations/washington/olympic-peninsula/port-angeles/marsha-melnick/ was running out of ideas for how to get her therapeutic exercise program into the living rooms of Parkinson's patients. For years, she had been trying to adapt the program, which employs clinically tested physical movements to improve gait and balance, into an accessible format for people to use at home. But the National Institutes of Health had alre

Megan Scudellari
Apr 29, 2010
In 2006, researcher linkurl:Marsha Melnick;http://www.therapeuticassociates.com/locations/washington/olympic-peninsula/port-angeles/marsha-melnick/ was running out of ideas for how to get her therapeutic exercise program into the living rooms of Parkinson's patients. For years, she had been trying to adapt the program, which employs clinically tested physical movements to improve gait and balance, into an accessible format for people to use at home. But the National Institutes of Health had already rejected a grant to make a video of it, so Melnick, a clinical professor of physical therapy at the University of California, San Francisco, with her collaborator linkurl:Glenna Dowling,;http://nurseweb.ucsf.edu/www/ffdowlg.htm applied again, this time for a grant to make a DVD of the program. But she was rejected a second time.
Image courtesy of Red Hill Studios
So Melnick and Dowling, chair of UCSF's Department of Physiological Nursing, reached out to linkurl:Red Hill Studios,;http://www.redhillstudios.com/flashsite/index.html an interactive media company thirty minutes north of San Francisco. They thought it...




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