Will new ESC rules hurt research?

The retroactive nature of the NIH's proposed guidelines on human stem cell research will exclude funding for many existing stem cell lines that were ethically created yet don't meet the stringent criteria of the proposal's technical requirements, according to a new linkurl:report;http://www.cell.com/cell-stem-cell/fulltext/S1934-5909(09)00210-0 published online today (May 14) in __Cell Stem Cell__. The proposed regulations outline nine distinct elements to be documented in written informed cons

Elie Dolgin
May 13, 2009
The retroactive nature of the NIH's proposed guidelines on human stem cell research will exclude funding for many existing stem cell lines that were ethically created yet don't meet the stringent criteria of the proposal's technical requirements, according to a new linkurl:report;http://www.cell.com/cell-stem-cell/fulltext/S1934-5909(09)00210-0 published online today (May 14) in __Cell Stem Cell__. The proposed regulations outline nine distinct elements to be documented in written informed consent forms for embryo donors, including prohibiting directed donation, barring financial compensation, and requiring that donors of unused IVF embryos sign at least two separate consent forms, one of which must avoid mention of stem cell research. All these rules apply retroactively.
Image: Patrick Taylor
Ahead of the NIH's linkurl:May 26th deadline;http://nihoerextra.nih.gov/stem_cells/add.htm for comments on the draft guidelines, the paper's author, Patrick Taylor, a lecturer at Harvard Medical School and deputy general counsel at Children's Hospital Boston, who co-chairs the International Society for Stem Cell Research's...

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