Willem Kolff dies

Willem Kolff with artificial heart courtesy of the Willem J. Kolff Collection at the University of Utah Marriott Library Willem Kolff, a University of Utah physician who invented the precursor to kidney dialysis and the first artificial heart, died last week a few days shy of his 98th birthday. Kolff received the 2002 Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Medical Research. He died of natural causes, the New York Times reported. The artificial heart that he helped develop "has now been used in ov

Tia Ghose
Feb 15, 2009
Willem Kolff with artificial heart

courtesy of the Willem J. Kolff Collection
at the University of Utah Marriott Library
Willem Kolff, a University of Utah physician who invented the precursor to kidney dialysis and the first artificial heart, died last week a few days shy of his 98th birthday. Kolff received the 2002 Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Medical Research. He died of natural causes, the New York Times reported. The artificial heart that he helped develop "has now been used in over 780 people," Don Olsen, a veterinarian at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, who worked with Kolff on the artificial heart, told The Scientist. In addition, he pioneered some of the early work on heart lung machines and cardiac-assist devices, said Joe Andrade, a bioengineer at the University of Utah who helped design some of the materials in the artificial kidneys and...
The Academy of AchievementThe Telegraph
Willem Kolff with a woman who received an artificial kidney and a calf with an artificial heart
Courtesy of the Willem J. Kolff Collection at the University of Utah Marriott Library
Telegraph

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