Worm glue to repair bones

Mimicking an adhesive naturally produced by marine worms, researchers have created a new glue that may help surgeons reconstruct shattered bone, they reported today (August 17) at the linkurl:American Chemical Society (ACS) 238th National Meeting;http://portal.acs.org/portal/acs/corg/content?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=PP_TRANSITIONMAIN&node_id=2053 in Washington, DC. Sandcastle wormImage: Russell Stewart"It's a wonderful advance," said biophysicist linkurl:Bob Baier;http://www.sdm.buffalo.edu/home.a

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef (an unusual nickname for Jennifer) got her master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses. After four years of diving off the Gulf...

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Aug 16, 2009
Mimicking an adhesive naturally produced by marine worms, researchers have created a new glue that may help surgeons reconstruct shattered bone, they reported today (August 17) at the linkurl:American Chemical Society (ACS) 238th National Meeting;http://portal.acs.org/portal/acs/corg/content?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=PP_TRANSITIONMAIN&node_id=2053 in Washington, DC.
Sandcastle worm
Image: Russell Stewart
"It's a wonderful advance," said biophysicist linkurl:Bob Baier;http://www.sdm.buffalo.edu/home.asp?id=554 of the State University of New York at Buffalo, who was not involved in the research. "It's a nice extrapolation from marine science to orthopedics." The sandcastle worm builds its tubular home out of sand and broken shells, which it glues together piece by piece with a protein-based cement. The most impressive part of the process: It's done entirely underwater. Bioengineer linkurl:Russell Stewart;http://www.bioen.utah.edu/directory/profile.php?userID=91 and his colleagues at the University of Utah are studying the adhesive in hopes of creating a synthetic glue that could be used to reassemble the small fragments of bone that result from complex breaks that...



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