Yeast: angiogenesis model? Yup

Yeast may not have blood vessels, but it could be a powerful model organism for studying angiogenesis, according to linkurl:a study;http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2010/03/11/0910200107.full.pdf+html published online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences yesterday (March 22, 2010) that describes a new, systems-biology approach for identifying surprising model organisms for human diseases. Image: Wikipedia"It's a Eureka moment of, gosh, I can't believe anybody didn't think of th

Alla Katsnelson
Mar 22, 2010
Yeast may not have blood vessels, but it could be a powerful model organism for studying angiogenesis, according to linkurl:a study;http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2010/03/11/0910200107.full.pdf+html published online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences yesterday (March 22, 2010) that describes a new, systems-biology approach for identifying surprising model organisms for human diseases.

Image: Wikipedia
"It's a Eureka moment of, gosh, I can't believe anybody didn't think of this before," said linkurl:Robb Krumlauf,;http://www.stowers-institute.org/labs/KrumlaufLab.asp a developmental biologist and scientific director of the Stowers Institute for Medical Research in Kansas City, Mo., who did not participate in the study. "Most people work in a very directed way" when studying human diseases, he added, but the current study brings to the fore how "looking at a plant meristem or a marine invertebrate would give you tremendous insight" into seemingly unrelated human diseases. Organisms as diverse as plants, worms and vertebrates share related groups of genes that encode...
DrosophilaC elegans



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