Menu

The Scientist’s 2017 Gift Guide

‘Tis the season to be sciency.

Dec 1, 2017
Shawna Williams

ISTOCK, MEJNAKClimate change mug

Know someone who’d enjoy contemplating the consequences of climate change over a cup of tea? This is the mug for him. As it warms up, sea levels rise on a map of the world, swallowing coastal cities and landmasses such as Florida. Available for $14 from the Unemployed Philosophers Guild.

 

 

 

A good read

This year’s crop of new science books includes Jennifer Doudna and Stephen Sternberg’s account of the CRISPR discovery and its import, A Crack in Creation: Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution. Another pick: Big Chicken, journalist Maryn McKenna’s deep dive into industrial agriculture, antibiotics, and the modern diet. Or if a coloring book is more your recipient’s speed, she might enjoy the Microbiology Society’s Multicolored Microbiomes.

 

Cell cookie cutters

It’s the gift your whole lab can enjoy: cookies shaped like cells. Available in human and plant iterations, these cookie cutters’ surprisingly detailed depictions of cellular contents are reminiscent of high school biology textbooks. Starting at $17, from Bakerology.

 

 

 

Biomedical books for babies

A is for amino acids, B is for buffer, and the web is full of book options for the budding genius in your life.  Options include the Baby Biochemist, Baby Medical School, and Baby University series. A popular title in the latter is Goodnight Lab, which features “a grumpy old professor shouting ‘publish!’”

 

 

STEM-themed girls’ clothes

She may already have the right books on the shelf, but if you really want your future scientist to look the part, clothes from Princess Awesome could help. What baby wouldn’t look great in an “atomic flurry” dress ($32)? Or for a more instructional approach, there’s a shirt ($20) laying out the scientific method.

 

 

Support for science

A crop of science-specialized crowdfunding sites—such as Crowd.Science, Experiment.com, and FutSci—enable giving to whatever research project strikes your fancy. A few to consider are campaigns to aid hurricane recovery at the Caribbean Primate Research Center, an important, decades-old site in Puerto Rico where scientists study free-ranging monkeys.

January 2019

Cannabis on Board

Research suggests ill effects of cannabinoids in the womb

Marketplace

Sponsored Product Updates

FORMULATRIX® digital PCR technology to be acquired by QIAGEN
FORMULATRIX® digital PCR technology to be acquired by QIAGEN
FORMULATRIX has announced that their digital PCR assets, including the CONSTELLATION® series of instruments, is being acquired by QIAGEN N.V. (NYSE: QGEN, Frankfurt Stock Exchange: QIA) for up to $260 million ($125 million upfront payment and $135 million of milestones).  QIAGEN has announced plans for a global launch in 2020 of a new series of digital PCR platforms that utilize the advanced dPCR technology developed by FORMULATRIX combined with QIAGEN’s expertise in assay development and automation.
Application of CRISPR/Cas to the Generation of Genetically Engineered Mice
Application of CRISPR/Cas to the Generation of Genetically Engineered Mice
With this application note from Taconic, learn about the power that the CRISPR/Cas system has to revolutionize the field of custom mouse model generation!
Translational Models of Obesity, Dysmetabolism, Diabetes, and Complications
Translational Models of Obesity, Dysmetabolism, Diabetes, and Complications
This webinar, from Crown Bioscience, presents a unique continuum of translational dysmetabolic platforms that more closely mimic human disease. Learn about using next-generation rodent and spontaneously diabetic non-human primate models to accurately model human-relevant disease progression and complications related to obesity and diabetes here!
BiochemAR: an augmented reality app for easy visualization of virtual 3D molecular models
BiochemAR: an augmented reality app for easy visualization of virtual 3D molecular models
Have you played Pokemon Go? Then you've used Augmented Reality (AR) technology! AR technology holds substantial promise and potential for providing a low-cost, easy to use digital platform for the manipulation of virtual 3D objects, including 3D models of biological macromolecules.