Standardizing IHC Work

Courtesy of Chemicon InternationalSmall research labs that can't justify spending tens of thousands of dollars on a sophisticated automated immuno-histochemistry (IHC) staining system can still Courtesy of Chemicon International benefit from more standardization. Enter the IHC Select Manual Staining System, released last October by Temecula, Calif.-based Chemicon International http://www.chemicon.com.Chemicon's device, which has a list price of $1,495 (US) for the basic kit, holds 40 capillary-g

Jul 19, 2004
Lissa Harris
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Courtesy of Chemicon International

Small research labs that can't justify spending tens of thousands of dollars on a sophisticated automated immuno-histochemistry (IHC) staining system can still Courtesy of Chemicon International benefit from more standardization. Enter the IHC Select Manual Staining System, released last October by Temecula, Calif.-based Chemicon International http://www.chemicon.com.

Chemicon's device, which has a list price of $1,495 (US) for the basic kit, holds 40 capillary-gap slides with a special coating that allows them to wick up reagent evenly and consistently from a tray. "A lot of laboratories do this procedure over a sink or in a box, dropping reagent on by hand," says product manager Terri Borree. "With this system, everything is controlled by being a single batch."

Galen Hostetter, director of the microarray lab at the Translational Genomics Research Institute in Phoenix, Ariz., has been using the Chemicon system since last fall; he says it is an enormous improvement over the over-the-sink procedure. "IHC isn't a terribly exact science as it is. You need every bit of standardization and uniformity you can get, or it gets to be a real nightmare," says Hostetter. "It's a great tool for the research laboratory, and it's affordable."

- Lissa Harris