March 2022, Issue 2 Table of Contents

Feature

Tumor microbiome composite
Could Cancer’s Microbiome Help Diagnose and Treat the Disease?
Jef Akst | Mar 14, 2022
A growing appreciation of the bacterial assemblages that live within tumors has researchers striving to understand and capitalize on their role.

Freeze Frame

Equid burial from Umm el-Marra, Syria
Caught on Camera
Caught on Camera
Selected images from the-scientist.com

The Literature

Natural sunbeams underwater through water surface in the Mediterranean sea on a seabed with neptune grass, Catalonia, Roses, Costa Brava, Spain
Marine Plant Partners with Microbes Like Terrestrial Plants Do
Marine Plant Partners with Microbes Like Terrestrial Plants Do
A seagrass relies on symbiotic bacteria inside its roots to fix nitrogen. This is the first time scientists have demonstrated that this relationship occurs in a marine plant.

Infographics

Illustration showing microbial signatures of cancer in the body
Infographic: Putting Cancer’s Unique Microbiomes to Use
Infographic: Putting Cancer’s Unique Microbiomes to Use
From diagnosis to tracking treatment responses, bacteria and other microbes in the blood, gut, and tumors of cancer patients may provide helpful hints for improving their care.

Scientist to Watch

Photo of Junyue Cao
Junyue Cao Applies Novel Approaches to Aging and Disease
Junyue Cao Applies Novel Approaches to Aging and Disease
The Rockefeller University geneticist is tracing the full lifespan of individual cells to better understand how and why humans age.

Careers

Illustration of scientists collaborating
How to Bring the Public into the Scientific Process
How to Bring the Public into the Scientific Process
A new wave of research is recruiting patients and other members of the public to serve as equal partners, bringing fresh perspectives to research on diseases and other conditions.

Reading Frames

Book cover of Why We Love: The New Science Behind Our Closest Relationships
Opinion: Can Science Capture Love?
Opinion: Can Science Capture Love?
Researchers who study the phenomenon in humans should incorporate subjective experiences into data on love.