March 2022, Issue 1 Table of Contents

Membership Open House!

Enjoy open access for a limited time to explore the benefits of membership with The Scientist.

Feature

Conceptual image showing fragmented X chromosomes
How Chaos in Chromosomes Helps Drive Cancer Spread
Samuel F. Bakhoum | Mar 1, 2022
A new link between inflammation and rampant chromosomal abnormalities reveals novel strategies to treat diverse malignancies.

Speaking of Science

March D1 2022 crossword
Ten Minute Sabbatical
Ten Minute Sabbatical
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse

Critic at Large

TK
Opinion: How to Confront Anti-Science Sentiment
Opinion: How to Confront Anti-Science Sentiment
Reaching a science skeptic is not a matter of credentials; it’s a matter of heart.

Notebook

Photo of a Jewel beetle <em>(Sternocera aequisignata)</em>.
Why Are Some Beetles Shiny? It’s Not What Researchers Thought
Why Are Some Beetles Shiny? It’s Not What Researchers Thought
The glossy shell of some beetles, it has long been speculated, helps hide the insects from predators. A recent paper put the hypothesis to the test—and found it wanting.
Photo of Romaine River in Quebec
Microbial Analysis of River Reveals Considerable Diversity
Microbial Analysis of River Reveals Considerable Diversity
Scientists in Canada trace how aquatic communities change as Quebec’s Romaine River flows into the sea.

Infographics

Infographic showing how bursting micronuclei promote cancer
Infographic: Chromosome Errors Cause Micronuclei and Drive Cancer
Infographic: Chromosome Errors Cause Micronuclei and Drive Cancer
When micronuclei rupture, chromosomes break, recombine, and form circles, causing inflammation and promoting carcinogenic growth.

The Literature

A photo of a triple-negative breast cancer cell
A Fasting-Mimicking Diet Thwarts Breast Cancer in Mice
A Fasting-Mimicking Diet Thwarts Breast Cancer in Mice
Coupling a diet low in calories, sugar, and protein with existing cancer drugs treats triple-negative breast cancer in mice, and low blood glucose is associated with better cancer outcomes in human patients.
Photo of a tiger moth
Antibiotics Given to Moths Spur Upregulation of Growth Genes
Antibiotics Given to Moths Spur Upregulation of Growth Genes
A new study has identified a molecular tradeoff between growth and immunity in moths in response to the administration of subtherapeutic doses of antibiotics, a common practice in animal husbandry.

Foundations

A photo of soybean pods
The Right Chemistry, 1935
The Right Chemistry, 1935
Percy Lavon Julian, a young, Black scientist working in Jim Crow America, gained international recognition after beating chemists at the University of Oxford in the race to synthesize the alkaloid physostigmine, used for decades as a treatment for glaucoma.