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December 2022, Issue 1 Table of Contents

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Feature

Cross section of an organic cell with intracellular organelles
How Intracellular Bacteria Hijack Your Cells
Catherine Offord | Dec 1, 2022 | 10+ min read
Scientists studying pathogens such as Chlamydia, Legionella, and Listeria get a master class in how to control the internal workings of mammalian cells.

Speaking of Science

crossword puzzle
Ten Minute Sabbatical
Ten Minute Sabbatical
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse

Critic at Large

Illustration of two locks; one being unlocked.
Opinion: The Promise and Plight of Open Data
Opinion: The Promise and Plight of Open Data
Open science serves to make the research process more transparent. But we are still waiting to realize the fruits of open-data policies at scientific journals.

Notebook

<em >Lymantria&nbsp;</em>species make ultrasonic, mechanical rasping noises when they hear bats nearby.&nbsp;
Many Moths Speak Up to Ward Off Bats
Many Moths Speak Up to Ward Off Bats
A decade-long, multicontinent study suggests that acoustic defense strategies are more common among moths than previously imagined.
Photo of floppy disks and motherboards
Inside the Project Trying to Save Datasets from Extinction
Inside the Project Trying to Save Datasets from Extinction
Researchers race to find ecological data kept on outdated media or in dusty backroom boxes—before they’re lost forever.

Infographics

Illustration showing how some intracellular bacteria, such as <em >Legionella pneumophila</em>, manipulate the cell&#39;s membranes for their own good
Infographic: Intracellular Bacteria’s Tricks for Host Manipulation 
Infographic: Intracellular Bacteria’s Tricks for Host Manipulation 
Various microbes, including several human pathogens, hijack the cell’s skeleton, membranes, and protein-making machinery to make themselves at home.

Scientist to Watch

Photo of Chantell Evans
Chantell Evans Tracks Mitochondrial Cleanup in Neurons
Chantell Evans Tracks Mitochondrial Cleanup in Neurons
The Duke University cell biologist uses live-cell microscopy to reveal how brain cells rid themselves of damaged mitochondria and what goes wrong in neurodegenerative disease.

Foundations

Diagram of the causes of mortality in the army in the east.
Diagrammatic War, 1858
Diagrammatic War, 1858
Pioneering nurse Florence Nightingale had an eye for creating memorable graphics that helped convince the general population that including sanitation reforms as part of public health policy would save British soldiers’ lives.
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