June 2022, Issue 1 Table of Contents

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Feature

A pair of zebra finches in a cage
Animal Divorce: When and Why Pairs Break Up
Catherine Offord | Jun 1, 2022
Many species of birds and other vertebrates form pair bonds and mate with just one other individual for much of their lives. But the unions don’t always work out. Scientists want to know the underlying factors.

Speaking of Science

Black-Browed Albatross
Ten Minute Sabbatical
Ten Minute Sabbatical
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse

Critic at Large

Data protection illustration
Opinion: Is Open Access Worth the Cost?
Opinion: Is Open Access Worth the Cost?
As we continue to transition out of the print era of scientific publishing, funders and institutions are paying a steep price to have trustworthy publishers certify research outcomes.

Slideshows

Cougar leaving the mine entrance
A World of Wildlife in Abandoned Mines
A World of Wildlife in Abandoned Mines
Scientists reveal how mountain lions, elk, and other animals are making use of these underground areas in Colorado.

Notebook

Archerfish in the deep transparent water.
Archerfish Defy Notion that Complex Vision Requires a Cortex
Archerfish Defy Notion that Complex Vision Requires a Cortex
The fish species is separated from mammals by hundreds of millions of years of evolution, yet its seemingly primitive brain can handle many of the same elaborate visual tasks.

Infographics

Infographic showing genetic and social monogamy in birds
Infographic: A New Look at Monogamy Across the Animal Kingdom
Infographic: A New Look at Monogamy Across the Animal Kingdom
Advances in genetics in recent years has revealed that many apparently exclusive pairs in fact sometimes mate with individuals other than their partner, but social monogamy is widespread.

The Literature

A microscope image of Legionellales bacteria infecting a protozoan
Ancestral Bacteria May Have Invaded Early Eukaryotic Cells
Ancestral Bacteria May Have Invaded Early Eukaryotic Cells
The discovery that a group of cell-infecting bacteria lived roughly 2 billion years ago stirs a longstanding controversy around which came first: phagocytosis or mitochondria.
An artist's rendering of the ancient arthropod Erratus sperare
Anatomical Firsts in Early Arthropods
Anatomical Firsts in Early Arthropods
A team of scientists have discovered an ancient arthropod that may show the origins of branched limbs and the first gill-like breathing structures in the clade.

Foundations

A black and white photo of a woman holding up a spider in a pair of tweezers
The Spider Lady, Circa 1939
The Spider Lady, Circa 1939
Nan Songer, a spider expert living in California, played an integral part in the Allies’ success in World War II by supplying silk for bombsights.