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Survey Questions
The Scientist Staff | Mar 31, 2013
Best Places to Work Postdocs
Survey Questions
The Scientist Staff | Apr 30, 2011
Survey Questions Best Places to Work Industry 2011 Category Question Research Environment My company provides adequate funding for my research. Research Environment My company’s research mission is logical and practical, and I understand my role in it. Research Environment Open collaboration with other company scientists helps ensure that I meet the company’s goals. Research Envi
Compact Model T
Hannah Waters | Apr 30, 2011
By Hannah Waters Compact Model T Dr. Klaus Boller / Photo Researchers, Inc (Human T Cell during Metaphase) The paper J.S. Rawlings et al., “Chromatin condensation via the condensin II complex is required for peripheral T-cell quiescence,” The EMBO Journal, 30:263-76, 2011. Free F1000 Evaluation The finding Naïve T cells remain in a quiescent state, becoming activated only when they encounter their complementary antigen during an immune res
Survey Methodology
The Scientist Staff | Apr 30, 2011
Survey Methodology Survey Form: A Web-based survey form was posted at www.the-scientist.com from September 8 to November 29, 2010. Results were collected and collated automatically.Invitations: E-mail invitations were sent to readers of The Scientist and registrants on The Scientist web site who identified themselves as working in commercial or industrial companies.Responses: 2,213 useable and qualified responses were received. Responses were rejected if the
Making the Gradient
Karen Hopkin | Apr 30, 2011
By Karen Hopkin Making the Gradient Ron Kaback didn’t believe that electrochemical gradients could power the transport of sugars and amino acids across cell membranes—until he proved that they do. H. RONALD KABACK Professor of Physiology University of California, Los Angeles F1000 Faculty Member: Neuronal Signaling Mechanisms Photo © 2011 Jim Cornfield Ron Kaback got hooked on membrane transport as a medical student at the Albert Einstei
Book excerpt from The Philosophical Breakfast Club
Laura J. Snyder | Apr 30, 2011
By Laura J. Snyder Book excerpt from The Philosophical Breakfast Club In Chapter 8, “A Divine Programmer,” author Laura J. Snyder explains how Darwin’s own ideas on evolution may have been influenced at lavish parties hosted by one of the club’s members, Charles Babbage On Monday, February 27, 1837, Charles Darwin delivered a talk at a meeting of the Cambridge Philosophical Society. Darwin wrote to his sister Caroline that night with news of
Andrew Carter: Dynein Trailblazer
Hannah Waters | Apr 30, 2011
By Hannah Waters Andrew Carter: Dynein Trailblazer Nick Morrish Group Leader, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Medical Research Council. Age: 36The typical biologist’s desk is strewn with reprints and lab notebooks, maybe a coffee cup, perhaps a small model of a DNA molecule. Structural biologist Andrew Carter’s workspace has all these things, but a cluster of framed dog photographs stands out amid the clutter: his collection of corgi pictu
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Apr 30, 2011
Contributors Lewis Wolpert was raised in South Africa where he trained to become a civil engineer specializing in soil mechanics, which he abandoned for cell biology in 1955. “A friend told me that soil mechanics wasn’t very sexy and that some of my work could be relevant to the study of cell mechanics,” he says. After obtaining a PhD from University of London, King’s College, Wolpert focused on morphogenesis with a special interest in the p
Going with the Flow
Kelly Rae Chi | Apr 30, 2011
By Kelly Rae Chi Going with the Flow A guide to the new wave of budget, easy-to-use flow cytometers In January Tim Bushnell, scientific and technical director of the University of Rochester Medical Center’s Flow Cytometry Core in New York State, packed a $50,000 flow cytometer in his car and drove it to a lab 15 minutes away. There, he trained beginners to use the technique—which identifies and sorts specific populations of cells—on the new benchtop
One Hip Dino
Jef Akst | Apr 30, 2011
By Jef Akst One Hip Dino An artist’s rendition of Brontomerus mcintoshi delivering a powerful kick to a Utahraptor Francisco Gascó For high school junior Mathew Wedel, an internship at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History in 1992 was a pretty sweet gig. He was one of those kids whose dinosaur phase had never worn off, and now he got to help prepare and catalog fossils and identify bones donated to the museum by local farmers. But the youn