Uncategorized
Survey Questions
The Scientist Staff | Apr 1, 2013
Best Places to Work Postdocs
Survey Questions
The Scientist Staff | May 1, 2011
Survey Questions Best Places to Work Industry 2011 Category Question Research Environment My company provides adequate funding for my research. Research Environment My company’s research mission is logical and practical, and I understand my role in it. Research Environment Open collaboration with other company scientists helps ensure that I meet the company’s goals. Research Envi
Survey Methodology
The Scientist Staff | May 1, 2011
Survey Methodology Survey Form: A Web-based survey form was posted at www.the-scientist.com from September 8 to November 29, 2010. Results were collected and collated automatically.Invitations: E-mail invitations were sent to readers of The Scientist and registrants on The Scientist web site who identified themselves as working in commercial or industrial companies.Responses: 2,213 useable and qualified responses were received. Responses were rejected if the
Book excerpt from The Philosophical Breakfast Club
Laura J. Snyder | May 1, 2011
By Laura J. Snyder Book excerpt from The Philosophical Breakfast Club In Chapter 8, “A Divine Programmer,” author Laura J. Snyder explains how Darwin’s own ideas on evolution may have been influenced at lavish parties hosted by one of the club’s members, Charles Babbage On Monday, February 27, 1837, Charles Darwin delivered a talk at a meeting of the Cambridge Philosophical Society. Darwin wrote to his sister Caroline that night with news of
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | May 1, 2011
Contributors Lewis Wolpert was raised in South Africa where he trained to become a civil engineer specializing in soil mechanics, which he abandoned for cell biology in 1955. “A friend told me that soil mechanics wasn’t very sexy and that some of my work could be relevant to the study of cell mechanics,” he says. After obtaining a PhD from University of London, King’s College, Wolpert focused on morphogenesis with a special interest in the p
One Hip Dino
Jef Akst | May 1, 2011
By Jef Akst One Hip Dino An artist’s rendition of Brontomerus mcintoshi delivering a powerful kick to a Utahraptor Francisco Gascó For high school junior Mathew Wedel, an internship at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History in 1992 was a pretty sweet gig. He was one of those kids whose dinosaur phase had never worn off, and now he got to help prepare and catalog fossils and identify bones donated to the museum by local farmers. But the youn
Lobster-Pot Science
Richard P. Grant | May 1, 2011
By Richard P. Grant Lobster-Pot Science Andrzej Krauze HIDDEN JEWEL Microbiology labs typically contain myriad flasks and stacks of petri dishes crowded with bacteria. That’s fine for someone studying their physiology or genetics. But for researchers wanting to gain insight into bacterial behavior, that laboratory setup is far from optimal. The problem is that homogeneous environments, such as petri dishes, are quite different from the n
New Blood for Gene Therapy
Megan Scudellari | May 1, 2011
By Megan Scudellari New Blood for Gene Therapy Klein working with five-year old Felix Ott, who was diagnosed with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome at age three. When he was four, Felix received stem-cell gene therapy, and the now seven-year-old has since been able to live a normal life. Verena Müller The two 3-year-olds were very, very sick. One was bleeding internally, suffered from severe eczema and anemia, and had multiple infections in his lungs and colon. The
Micro Farmers
Cristina Luiggi | May 1, 2011
By Cristina Luiggi Micro Farmers Dustin Rubenstein discusses how the discovery of amoebas that farm their own food links the development of agriculture with the evolution of social behavior. Although agriculture is often touted as a pivotal human invention, it is not unique to us. It turns out that even slime molds with a penchant for sociality can farm. For Dustin Rubenstein, an evolutionary ecologist at Columbia University, this unexpected finding points to an e
Skeleton Keys
Lewis Wolpert | May 1, 2011
By Lewis Wolpert Skeleton Keys There are a surprising number of unknowns about how our limbs come to be symmetrical. If you stretch out your arms or legs and compare their length, you will, in most cases, find that they are very similar. Indeed, the external features of our body are reliably symmetrical; a noticeably asymmetrical feature is perceived as an abnormality. Related Articles Down to the bone Of mice and paws Signaling blocker halts bone growth