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The Scientist Staff | Mar 31, 2013
Best Places to Work Postdocs
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Apr 30, 2011
Contributors Lewis Wolpert was raised in South Africa where he trained to become a civil engineer specializing in soil mechanics, which he abandoned for cell biology in 1955. “A friend told me that soil mechanics wasn’t very sexy and that some of my work could be relevant to the study of cell mechanics,” he says. After obtaining a PhD from University of London, King’s College, Wolpert focused on morphogenesis with a special interest in the p
Going with the Flow
Kelly Rae Chi | Apr 30, 2011
By Kelly Rae Chi Going with the Flow A guide to the new wave of budget, easy-to-use flow cytometers In January Tim Bushnell, scientific and technical director of the University of Rochester Medical Center’s Flow Cytometry Core in New York State, packed a $50,000 flow cytometer in his car and drove it to a lab 15 minutes away. There, he trained beginners to use the technique—which identifies and sorts specific populations of cells—on the new benchtop
One Hip Dino
Jef Akst | Apr 30, 2011
By Jef Akst One Hip Dino An artist’s rendition of Brontomerus mcintoshi delivering a powerful kick to a Utahraptor Francisco Gascó For high school junior Mathew Wedel, an internship at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History in 1992 was a pretty sweet gig. He was one of those kids whose dinosaur phase had never worn off, and now he got to help prepare and catalog fossils and identify bones donated to the museum by local farmers. But the youn
Simplifying Teaching
Hannah Waters | Apr 30, 2011
By Hannah Waters Simplifying Teaching How to make your teaching more efficient, effective, and enjoyable without slighting your lab projects Carrie O’neill © ImageZoo/Corbis When he took his first job at Arizona State University, James Elser had spent nearly a decade in the lab and didn’t really know what to expect when it came to teaching. After instructing a few graduate classes, he was tossed in front of his first large class for nonsci
Lobster-Pot Science
Richard P. Grant | Apr 30, 2011
By Richard P. Grant Lobster-Pot Science Andrzej Krauze HIDDEN JEWEL Microbiology labs typically contain myriad flasks and stacks of petri dishes crowded with bacteria. That’s fine for someone studying their physiology or genetics. But for researchers wanting to gain insight into bacterial behavior, that laboratory setup is far from optimal. The problem is that homogeneous environments, such as petri dishes, are quite different from the n
Wanted: Another Scientific Revolution
Laura J. Snyder | Apr 30, 2011
By Laura J. Snyder Wanted: Another Scientific Revolution In the 19th century, four friends changed the way scientists viewed themselves. It’s time for another shake-up. Broadway Books, 2011 When H.M.S. Beagle set sail from Plymouth Sound on December 27, 1831, the ship’s young naturalist, Charles Darwin, was a self-proclaimed “natural philosopher.” By the time he disembarked the ship about five years later, he was a “scientist”
New Blood for Gene Therapy
Megan Scudellari | Apr 30, 2011
By Megan Scudellari New Blood for Gene Therapy Klein working with five-year old Felix Ott, who was diagnosed with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome at age three. When he was four, Felix received stem-cell gene therapy, and the now seven-year-old has since been able to live a normal life. Verena Müller The two 3-year-olds were very, very sick. One was bleeding internally, suffered from severe eczema and anemia, and had multiple infections in his lungs and colon. The
Capsule Reviews
Bob Grant | Apr 30, 2011
By Bob Grant Capsule Reviews Biopunk: DIY Scientists Hack the Software of Life by Marcus Wohlsen Current, April 2011 In the 1970s brash, young mavericks like Bill Gates and Apple’s two Steves (Wozniak and Jobs) toiled in their respective garages creating software and hardware that would one day revolutionize society’s relationship with computers—all without the benefit of towering office high-rises or financial backing from investors with
Micro Farmers
Cristina Luiggi | Apr 30, 2011
By Cristina Luiggi Micro Farmers Dustin Rubenstein discusses how the discovery of amoebas that farm their own food links the development of agriculture with the evolution of social behavior. Although agriculture is often touted as a pivotal human invention, it is not unique to us. It turns out that even slime molds with a penchant for sociality can farm. For Dustin Rubenstein, an evolutionary ecologist at Columbia University, this unexpected finding points to an e