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Bombs and biodiversity go hand in hand

Bombs and biodiversity go hand in hand Military installations across the United States include many unique habitats and are home to the most endangered plant and animal species of any federally-owned land. Staff writer Kerry Grens visited the Warren Grove Gunnery Range in southern New Jersey to check out the largest pitch pine pygmy forest in the world and find out what officers there are doing to preserve it. var FO = { movie:"http://www.the-scientist.com/supplementary/flash/43708/co

kerry grens
Kerry Grens

Kerry served as The Scientist’s news director until 2021. Before joining The Scientist in 2013, she was a stringer for Reuters Health, the senior health and science reporter at...

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Bombs and biodiversity go hand in hand

Military installations across the United States include many unique habitats and are home to the most endangered plant and animal species of any federally-owned land. Staff writer Kerry Grens visited the Warren Grove Gunnery Range in southern New Jersey to check out the largest pitch pine pygmy forest in the world and find out what officers there are doing to preserve it.

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