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Double ratio

The endogenous fluorophore PpIX labels cells in a rat brain tumor (left), but the fluorescence is absent after surgery to resect the tumor (right). Credit: Brian Wilson, University of Toronto" />The endogenous fluorophore PpIX labels cells in a rat brain tumor (left), but the fluorescence is absent after surgery to resect the tumor (right). Credit: Brian Wilson, University of Toronto

Richard Gaughan
<figcaption>The endogenous fluorophore PpIX labels cells in a rat brain tumor (left), but the fluorescence is absent after surgery to resect the tumor (right). Credit: Brian Wilson, University of Toronto</figcaption>
The endogenous fluorophore PpIX labels cells in a rat brain tumor (left), but the fluorescence is absent after surgery to resect the tumor (right). Credit: Brian Wilson, University of Toronto

Researcher:

Brian Wilson, Professor of Medical Physics, University of Toronto

Project:

Identifying and quantifying brain-tumor tissue to allow surgeons who are resecting a tumor to determine if any cancerous cells remain

Problem:

Wilson encountered a trifecta of confounding factors that often plague in vivo fluorescence: Background autofluorescence masks the signal; optical absorption and scattering can reduce both excitation and emission intensity; and changes in position, angle, and distance of the light source and camera all influence the measured intensity.

Solution:

Wilson developed a protocol that compensates for all three problems at once. He harnesses an endogenous fluorophore, protoporphyrin-IX (PpIX), to act...

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