Enemies of the State

COURTESY OF LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, PRINTS AND PHOTOGRAPHS DIVISION Bush's isn't the only administration to use science selectively. Here's a sampling of previous incidents: Truman Subjected almost 60,000 federal scientists and those with access to classified information to security reviews, costing some clearances and work. Nixon Dissolved the office of the presidential science advisor. Asked candidate to head Nat

Alison McCook
Oct 1, 2006
COURTESY OF LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, PRINTS AND PHOTOGRAPHS DIVISION

Bush's isn't the only administration to use science selectively.
Here's a sampling of previous incidents:

Truman
  • Subjected almost 60,000 federal scientists and those with access to classified information to security reviews, costing some clearances and work.
Nixon
  • Dissolved the office of the presidential science advisor.
  • Asked candidate to head National Science Foundation to endorse controversial antiballistic missile program (ABM); when he refused, he was asked to withdraw for "personal" reasons.
  • Refused to publish a report by panel chaired by presidential science advisor criticizing the president's project to create a supersonic passenger jet.
Reagan
  • Pursued "Star Wars" national missile defense program, costing taxpayers billions of dollars, despite scientists' advice it wouldn't work.
  • Publicly denounced evolution during presidential campaign, suggested public schools teach creationism.
  • Appointed science advisor who declined to speak against teaching of creationism.
  • Developed "hit list" of scientists labeled according to...


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