Erich Jarvis

By Kirsten Weir Erich Jarvis Associate Professor of Neurobiology, Duke University © LES TODD As the stage lights went down on his graduation dance performance at New York's High School of the Performing Arts, Erich Jarvis decided on his future. He'd been

Kirsten Weir
Nov 1, 2006


Erich Jarvis
Associate Professor of Neurobiology, Duke University



© LES TODD

As the stage lights went down on his graduation dance performance at New York's High School of the Performing Arts, Erich Jarvis decided on his future. He'd been struggling to choose between a career in science or in dance. With a scholarship to Hunter College waiting for him, he decided he could make a bigger impact on the world as a scientist. "My mother influenced me to think that science was one of the ways to change the world," Jarvis recalls. "It just clicked: I want to be a scientist."

At Hunter, Jarvis worked closely with molecular biologist Rivka Rudner. He threw himself into research, Rudner recalls, coauthoring six papers as an undergraduate. "You had to kick him out of the lab so he'd go home and sleep," says Rudner.

Jarvis earned a PhD in molecular neurobiology and animal...

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