'One-Party Science' Poses Threat To Scientists' Intellectual Freedom

Intellectual Freedom For the past decade or so, as many people are aware, my research has focused on assessing racial differences as manifested in brain size and intelligence. Startling and, I have come to understand, alarming to many people is my challenge to the prevailing view that if all people were treated the same, most race differences would disappear. I have found, for example, that Asians and Africans average at opposite

J Rushton
Oct 2, 1994

Intellectual Freedom

For the past decade or so, as many people are aware, my research has focused on assessing racial differences as manifested in brain size and intelligence. Startling and, I have come to understand, alarming to many people is my challenge to the prevailing view that if all people were treated the same, most race differences would disappear. I have found, for example, that Asians and Africans average at opposite ends of a continuum ranging over 60 anatomical and social variables, with Europeans intermediate. Based on my studies, I have proposed a gene-based evolutionary theory of racial patterns.

I can understand why, for nonscientists, some of my findings have become an object of scorn; indeed, some critics believe that my research should be banned. And this is disturbing to me, of course. But of real concern is the behavior of many in the scientific community, who repress publication of...

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