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The brain on drugs

The brain on drugs Drugs elevate CREB activity in the nucleus accumbens by activating cyclic AMP pathway, causing protein kinase A to translocate to the nucleus and phosphorylate CREB. Target genes involved in addiction include dynorphin, corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH or CRF ), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), glutamate receptor subunit GluR1.By Kerry Grens ARTICLE EXTRAS Addictive Research Ho

kerry grens
Kerry Grens

Kerry served as The Scientist’s news director until 2021. Before joining The Scientist in 2013, she was a stringer for Reuters Health, the senior health and science reporter at...

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The brain on drugs

Drugs elevate CREB activity in the nucleus accumbens by activating cyclic AMP pathway, causing protein kinase A to translocate to the nucleus and phosphorylate CREB. Target genes involved in addiction include dynorphin, corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH or CRF ), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), glutamate receptor subunit GluR1.
By Kerry Grens

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