The Trouble with Markers

FEATUREThe Longevity Dividend The Trouble with MarkersBY MICHAEL O'NEILLEvaluating a potential anti-aging therapeutic poses a unique challenge. When the endpoint is natural death, assessing efficacy in a realistic timeframe requires a surrogate, but biomarkers for aging have been elusive. ARTICLE EXTRASRelated Articles: In Pursuit of the Longevity DividendWhat should we be doing to prepare for the unprecedent

Nigel O'Neill
Feb 28, 2006
FEATURE
The Longevity Dividend

The Trouble with Markers

Evaluating a potential anti-aging therapeutic poses a unique challenge. When the endpoint is natural death, assessing efficacy in a realistic timeframe requires a surrogate, but biomarkers for aging have been elusive.

"There are no biomarkers that are very good at predicting of subsequent longevity, and that is the gold standard of what a biomarker is," says Tom Johnson of the University of Colorado at Boulder. While clinical research still rests largely on physiological status such as diastolic function, some argue that genomics or proteomics may provide more precise molecular markers.

Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine...