ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Video: First-responders to HIV in Haiti reminisce

var FO = { movie:"http://www.the-scientist.com/supplementary/flash/54384/vid1.swf", width:"400", height:"550", majorversion:"8", build:"0", xi:"false"}; UFO.create(FO, "ufoDemo"); Video: First-responders to HIV in Haiti reminisceIn our March issue, staff writer Bob Grant traveled to Haiti to see the science behind a successful public health program in a developing country. He spent time at a clinic in one of the poorest neighborhoods in Port-au-Prince and met research

Bob Grant
Bob Grant

Bob Grant is Editor in Chief of The Scientist, where he started in 2007 as a Staff Writer.

View full profile.


Learn about our editorial policies.

Video: First-responders to HIV in Haiti reminisce

In our March issue, staff writer Bob Grant traveled to Haiti to see the science behind a successful public health program in a developing country. He spent time at a clinic in one of the poorest neighborhoods in Port-au-Prince and met researchers who have been battling the HIV/AIDS epidemic since it began ravishing the country in the early 1980s. In these videos, Haitian physicians Jean Pape and Bernard Liautaud remember their early work with Haitian HIV/AIDS patients at a time when the international community was just waking up to the problem.

Pape and Liautaud recognized that HIV/AIDS was gaining a foothold in their country before the disease was called an epidemic - before it even had a name. In 1982 the two, along with several colleagues in Haiti and abroad, started The Haitian Study Group on Kaposi's Sarcoma and Opportunistic Infections (GHESKIO)...

In our March issue, staff writer Bob Grant traveled to Haiti to see the science behind a successful public health program in a developing country. He spent time at a clinic in one of the poorest neighborhoods in Port-au-Prince and met researchers who have been battling the HIV/AIDS epidemic since it began ravishing the country in the early 1980s. In these videos, Haitian physicians Jean Pape and Bernard Liautaud remember their early work with Haitian HIV/AIDS patients at a time when the international community was just waking up to the problem.

Pape and Liautaud recognized that HIV/AIDS was gaining a foothold in their country before the disease was called an epidemic - before it even had a name. In 1982 the two, along with several colleagues in Haiti and abroad, started The Haitian Study Group on Kaposi's Sarcoma and Opportunistic Infections (GHESKIO) in downtown Port-au-Prince. GHESKIO is still in operation today, and thousands of Haitians pass through its guarded gates every year.

Please download the Adobe Flash Player to view this content:

Get macromedia Flash Player

Interested in reading more?

Magaizne Cover

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?
ADVERTISEMENT