Vital mask

GFP-labeled T cells and background autofluorescence is almost impossible to distinguish (left). Friedman pulls out the T cells by double labeling them with an orange vital dye (right). Credit: Rachel Friedman and Matthew Krummel, UC San Francisco" />GFP-labeled T cells and background autofluorescence is almost impossible to distinguish (left). Friedman pulls out the T cells by double labeling them with an orange

Richard Gaughan
Jul 1, 2008
<figcaption>GFP-labeled T cells and background autofluorescence is almost impossible to distinguish (left). Friedman pulls out the T cells by double labeling them with an orange vital dye (right). Credit: Rachel Friedman and Matthew Krummel, UC San Francisco</figcaption>
GFP-labeled T cells and background autofluorescence is almost impossible to distinguish (left). Friedman pulls out the T cells by double labeling them with an orange vital dye (right). Credit: Rachel Friedman and Matthew Krummel, UC San Francisco

User:

Rachel Friedman, a postdoc in the lab of Matthew Krummel, Associate Professor of Pathology at University of California, San Francisco

Project:

Investigating T cell-receptor dynamics during initial response to antigens

Problem:

Friedman images surgically exposed or explanted lymph nodes to examine T cell behavior. The inflammatory response draws nonspecific macrophages and dendritic cells to the lymph node; these emit their own autofluorescent light as bright as the light from the green fluorescent protein (GFP) marker she uses.

Solution:

Friedman compensates for background using dual labels. She injects a recipient mouse with T cells...

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