Amanda Heidt

Amanda Heidt

Midway through her master’s degree in marine science, Amanda realized how few scientists felt comfortable speaking about their work. She challenged herself to share her research and ultimately went on to complete a second master’s in science communication at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Formerly an intern at The Scientist, she joined the staff in March 2021 as assistant editor, writing for all sections of the print magazine and website and editing the Scientist to Watch and Short Lit sections from her home in Utah. Read more of her work at www.amandaheidt.com.

Articles by Amanda Heidt
When Severed, This Solitary Tunicate Regrows as Three New Animals
When Severed, This Solitary Tunicate Regrows as Three New Animals
Amanda Heidt | May 13, 2021
While regeneration has long been the domain of colonial tunicates, a solitary species of sea squirt was able to regenerate into multiple, fully functional individuals within a month of being cut up.
Dinoflagellate Genome Structure Unlike Any Other Known
Dinoflagellate Genome Structure Unlike Any Other Known
Amanda Heidt | May 10, 2021
The transcription of DNA drives the remarkably tidy organization of chromosomes in the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium microadriaticum.
Biden Administration Backs Vaccine Intellectual Property Waiver
Biden Administration Backs Vaccine Intellectual Property Waiver
Amanda Heidt | May 10, 2021
The move, which is not supported by the pharmaceutical industry, would allow other countries to design and manufacture COVID-19 vaccines without fear of litigation.
Brain’s Lymphatic System Tied to Alzheimer’s Symptoms in Mice
Brain’s Lymphatic System Tied to Alzheimer’s Symptoms in Mice
Amanda Heidt | May 4, 2021
A dysfunctional lymphatic system, described as a clogging of the brain’s sink, may explain why immunotherapies fail in some Alzheimer’s patients.
Bill to Greatly Expand Wolf Hunting in Idaho Heads to Governor
Bill to Greatly Expand Wolf Hunting in Idaho Heads to Governor
Amanda Heidt | Apr 28, 2021
If signed, the law would boost funding for independent contractors to kill wolves and would allow for more than 90 percent of the population in the state to be taken by hunters.
Laurence “Larry” Kedes, Molecular Geneticist, Dies at 83
Laurence “Larry” Kedes, Molecular Geneticist, Dies at 83
Amanda Heidt | Apr 26, 2021
In addition to isolating the first protein-coding gene from a eukaryote, Kedes furthered scientists’ understanding of actin genes and also laid the foundations for modern DNA databases such as GenBank.
Conservation Biologists May Unintentionally Spread Pathogens
Conservation Biologists May Unintentionally Spread Pathogens
Amanda Heidt | Apr 19, 2021
When conservationists relocate species, they don’t always account for the pathogens hitching a ride, and the consequences of introducing them to a new environment.
NIH Reverses Limits on Human Fetal Tissue Research
NIH Reverses Limits on Human Fetal Tissue Research
Amanda Heidt | Apr 19, 2021
A new ruling removes the requirement that grants and proposals using the material receive approval from an ethical review board, reverting to the process in place before 2019.
New Report Dissects Ethics of Emerging Human Brain Cell Models
New Report Dissects Ethics of Emerging Human Brain Cell Models
Amanda Heidt | Apr 12, 2021
The National Academies’ report touches on ethical issues raised by new technologies such as brain organoids and human-animal chimeras, and suggests that current regulatory oversight is sufficient.
Environmental DNA Can Be Pulled from the Air
Environmental DNA Can Be Pulled from the Air
Amanda Heidt | Apr 7, 2021
A proof-of-concept study uses eDNA in the air to detect mammals, expanding the technique beyond aquatic sampling.