Amanda Heidt

Amanda Heidt

Midway through her master’s degree in marine science, Amanda realized how few scientists felt comfortable speaking about their work. She challenged herself to share her research and ultimately went on to complete a second master’s in science communication at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Formerly an intern at The Scientist, she joined the staff in March 2021 as assistant editor, writing for all sections of the print magazine and website and editing the Scientist to Watch, Foundations, and Short Lit sections from her home in Utah. Read more of her work at www.amandaheidt.com.

Articles by Amanda Heidt
Researchers Head to the Hills to Study Pregnancy
Researchers Head to the Hills to Study Pregnancy
Amanda Heidt | Aug 1, 2021
High altitude is a natural laboratory for investigating pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and gestational hypertension that restrict a fetus’s oxygen supply.
Push to Address Long-Standing Challenges for Parents in STEMM
Push to Address Long-Standing Challenges for Parents in STEMM
Amanda Heidt | Jul 21, 2021
The organizers behind a Mothers in Science conference say that it’s time academia provide more support to researchers who are pregnant or looking after children.
Tiny Hitchhikers Reveal Turtles’ Movements and Foraging Ecology
Tiny Hitchhikers Reveal Turtles’ Movements and Foraging Ecology
Amanda Heidt | Jul 13, 2021
Microscopic creatures called epibionts that live on sea turtles’ shells can help researchers understand their secretive lives.
First Immortal Cell Line Cultured for Reef-Building Corals
First Immortal Cell Line Cultured for Reef-Building Corals
Amanda Heidt | Jul 1, 2021
Lab-grown cells from the reef-building coral Acropora tenuis provide new opportunities to study bleaching, symbioses, and biomineralization.
Infographic: How Scientists Are Creating Coral Cell Lines
Infographic: How Scientists Are Creating Coral Cell Lines
Amanda Heidt | Jul 1, 2021
Stable, long-term cell lines will enable scientists to study everything from coral bleaching to biomineralization, knowledge that may help protect corals from ongoing climate change.
Q&A: Eating Milk Chocolate in the Morning Boosts Fat Metabolism
Q&A: Eating Milk Chocolate in the Morning Boosts Fat Metabolism
Amanda Heidt | Jun 30, 2021
A study of 19 postmenopausal women found that eating a bar of chocolate in the morning affected their bodies differently than eating it at night, but neither led to weight gain.
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“Dragon Man” May Replace Neanderthal as Our Closest Relative
“Dragon Man” May Replace Neanderthal as Our Closest Relative
Amanda Heidt | Jun 25, 2021
A massive, well-preserved skull discovered in China in the 1930s belongs to a new species called Homo longi, researchers report, but experts remain skeptical about the evidence.
Vitamin D Deficiency Drives Opioid Addiction in Mice
Vitamin D Deficiency Drives Opioid Addiction in Mice
Amanda Heidt | Jun 16, 2021
Mice with low vitamin D had exaggerated craving for opioids and felt the drugs’ effects more strongly—results supported in part by human medical records—suggesting that supplements should be explored as treatments for opioid use disorders.
Sexual Harassment Complaints in Academia Are Up Since 2018
Sexual Harassment Complaints in Academia Are Up Since 2018
Amanda Heidt | Jun 14, 2021
The NIH shared new data detailing complaints it has received in recent years, the latest in a series of steps taken by funding agencies and professional organizations to address misconduct.
Scientists Discover “Gorditas” and Other Novel Brain Cell Types
Scientists Discover “Gorditas” and Other Novel Brain Cell Types
Amanda Heidt | Jun 10, 2021
A pool of neural stem cells that ordinarily lies dormant in the brains of adult mice spawns two types of never-before-documented glial cells when artificially reactivated, potentially pointing to a novel mechanism of brain plasticity.