Christie Wilcox

Christie Wilcox

Christie was a well-established science blogger and writer when she was awarded a PhD from the University of Hawaii in 2014 for her research on the genetics of lionfishes. A short two years later, she published her debut book Venomous: How Earth’s Deadliest Creatures Mastered Biochemistry, which received widespread acclaim, and after that, she fully left academia behind and established herself as a science writer and editor. She joined The Scientist in 2021 as the newsletter editor.

Articles by Christie Wilcox
Hawai‘i Legislature Terminates Tenured Professor’s Position
Hawai‘i Legislature Terminates Tenured Professor’s Position
Christie Wilcox | Jul 21, 2021
Thanks to administrative shuffling, professor Carl-Wilhelm Vogel remains employed at the University of Hawai‘i despite the removal of his position in the new state budget, but the university’s faculty union says lawmakers might have crossed a legal line.
My Daughter’s First Pet—the Next Big Model Organism?
My Daughter’s First Pet—the Next Big Model Organism?
Christie Wilcox | Jul 15, 2021
Bettas were likely the first fish welcomed into human homes. Now, scientists are welcoming them into the lab to learn how genes dictate their appearance and behavior.
Sodas, Lemon Juice Cause False Positives in Rapid COVID-19 Tests
Sodas, Lemon Juice Cause False Positives in Rapid COVID-19 Tests
Christie Wilcox | Jul 12, 2021
Lateral flow tests for COVID-19 can be very accurate and specific when used as directed, but introducing acidic fluids can cause the tests’ detecting antibodies to clump, which may read as a positive result.
Trout Appear to Get Hooked on Meth
Trout Appear to Get Hooked on Meth
Christie Wilcox | Jul 6, 2021
After eight weeks of exposure to ecologically plausible levels of methamphetamines, the fish tended to prefer meth-laced water over water without the drug.
Tuna Story Exposes Challenges of Seafood Authentication
Tuna Story Exposes Challenges of Seafood Authentication
Christie Wilcox | Jul 1, 2021
A New York Times investigation’s failure to amplify tuna DNA from Subway’s tuna salad sandwiches likely says more about the complexities of identifying processed fish than about the ingredients.
Lots of Rapid Evolution in Interferon-Stimulated Genes: Study
Lots of Rapid Evolution in Interferon-Stimulated Genes: Study
Christie Wilcox | Jul 1, 2021
A comparison of interferon-related genes across 20 primate genomes reveals differences in the speed at which they evolve and new targets for antiviral discovery efforts.
“Lemon Frost” Leopard Geckos’ Cancers Similar to Human Melanomas
“Lemon Frost” Leopard Geckos’ Cancers Similar to Human Melanomas
Christie Wilcox | Jun 24, 2021
The color morph’s bright yellow hue and its propensity for skin tumors both likely stem from a gene implicated in a dangerous form of human skin cancer, suggesting the animals could make an ideal model for studying the disease.
Deadly Facial Tumors Spur Tasmanian Devil Evolution: Study
Deadly Facial Tumors Spur Tasmanian Devil Evolution: Study
Christie Wilcox | Jun 16, 2021
The largest study to date of the animals’ genetics provides robust evidence that they are adapting to survive a highly lethal, contagious cancer scientists feared would cause their extinction.
Why Turkey’s Sea of Marmara Is Full of Marine Snot
Why Turkey’s Sea of Marmara Is Full of Marine Snot
Christie Wilcox | Jun 11, 2021
Turkish officials are scrambling to clean up a massive, gooey plankton bloom that’s sliming the country’s ports and could suffocate the area’s marine ecosystems.
US Senate Passes Bill for Nearly $250 Billion in Science Funding
US Senate Passes Bill for Nearly $250 Billion in Science Funding
Christie Wilcox | Jun 9, 2021
The legislation, which now heads to the House, aims to ensure the country can compete with China technologically by supporting research and development over the next five years.