large brown moth
Science Snapshot: Insect Resurrection
The potentially-invasive moth hasn’t been seen in a century.
ABOVE: US Customs and Border Protection
Science Snapshot: Insect Resurrection
Science Snapshot: Insect Resurrection

The potentially-invasive moth hasn’t been seen in a century.

The potentially-invasive moth hasn’t been seen in a century.

ABOVE: US Customs and Border Protection

insects

Bat perching upside down in a cave.
Some Bats Buzz Like Hornets to Deter Predators
Natalia Mesa | May 9, 2022
The behavior is the first example of a mammal mimicking a more-dangerous species.
A landscape showing a forest that’s been cleared to make room for a farm.
Climate Change and Agriculture Together Halve Insect Populations
Dan Robitzski | Apr 21, 2022
Insect populations and species diversity are drastically reduced in areas affected by both climate change and agriculture-related habitat destruction, according to a new study.
Photo of a Jewel beetle <em>(Sternocera aequisignata)</em>.
Why Are Some Beetles Shiny? It’s Not What Researchers Thought
Connor Lynch | Mar 1, 2022
The glossy shell of some beetles, it has long been speculated, helps hide the insects from predators. A recent paper put the hypothesis to the test—and found it wanting.
Photo of a tiger moth
Antibiotics Given to Moths Spur Upregulation of Growth Genes
Devin A. Reese | Mar 1, 2022
A new study has identified a molecular tradeoff between growth and immunity in moths in response to the administration of subtherapeutic doses of antibiotics, a common practice in animal husbandry.
One chimpanzee grooming another on its chin
Chimps Appear to Treat Others' Wounds Using Insects
Natalia Mesa | Feb 7, 2022
The practice, which hasn’t been previously observed among nonhuman animals, may be a display of empathy. 
A photo of a termite’s head with its brain clearly visible
Termite Brains Anticipate Future Visual Challenges
Chloe Tenn | Feb 1, 2022
Dampwood termites with the potential to leave the colony have larger optic lobes before ever being exposed to different visual environments, an example of predictive brain plasticity.
A black and brown ant stands over various sizes of whitish purple, oval shaped larvae and yellow, oblong eggs
A Single Transcription Factor Changes Ants to Queens
Abby Olena | Nov 5, 2021
The transcription factor can also drive the opposite transition depending on which hormone activates it, according to a new study.
With Video
An Australian water beetle walks on the underside of the water's surface.
Australian Beetles Walk on the Underside of Water’s Surface
Lisa Winter | Jul 15, 2021
Watch one scurry around upside down in a remarkably unusual form of locomotion.
Cicada nymph on a tree, shedding its exoskeleton
Scientists Go Down the Cicada Hole
Lisa Winter | Jun 24, 2021
Brood X’s emergence tunnels—numbering in the hundreds per square meter of soil—give researchers a special opportunity to study how such extreme soil aeration affects the ecosystem.
Invertebrate Density Influences Plant Flowering Times, Abundance
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2021
An experimental study explores how plant communities may be affected by future declines in invertebrate populations.
Fly Colonies Help Calculate Time of Death of Car Trunk Cadavers
Ashley Yeager | Jul 13, 2020
Using pigs as human proxies, forensic entomologists reveal how bodies in vehicles decompose differently from those dumped outside.
What Makes a Venus Flytrap Snap
Kerry Grens | Mar 1, 2020
To avoid wasting digestive energy, the plant only seals shut after sensing certain prey movements.
Infographic: How a Venus Flytrap Snaps
Kerry Grens | Mar 1, 2020
Trigger hairs on the lobes of the trap are tuned to respond to wriggling prey.
Generations of Insect Attacks Drive Plants to “Talk” Publicly
Ashley Yeager | Mar 1, 2020
Goldenrods that evolved in the presence of herbivores release volatile chemicals that trigger defenses in neighboring plants of their species, even those that are genetically unrelated.
Eating Up the Food Chain
The Scientist Staff | Jan 13, 2020
Watch a predaceous diving beetle dine on a tadpole.
Genetics Models Move Beyond Drosophila and the Humble Lab Mouse
Amber Dance | Sep 1, 2019
Organisms with unusual genomes are helping scientists investigate gene regulation, evolution, and development.
Milkweed bug
Image of the Day: High Contrast
Carolyn Wilke | Apr 2, 2019
Of the Hemiptera bugs, milkweed-chomping Oncopeltus fasciatus have hung onto more smell and taste receptors than their liquid-guzzling relatives.
Image of the Day: Under the Microscope
Carolyn Wilke | Mar 5, 2019
A virtual exhibition of C.R. Percival’s slides reveals the natural world up close.
Image of the Day: Attendance Record
Carolyn Wilke | Feb 11, 2019
Genetic material left behind on flowers can reveal which insects have visited.