Photograph looking up a tree trunk
Contrary to Common Belief, Some Older Trees Make Fewer Seeds
An analysis of more than half a million trees reveals that many species begin to taper off seed production once they hit a certain size.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, MARTINWIMMER
Contrary to Common Belief, Some Older Trees Make Fewer Seeds
Contrary to Common Belief, Some Older Trees Make Fewer Seeds

An analysis of more than half a million trees reveals that many species begin to taper off seed production once they hit a certain size.

An analysis of more than half a million trees reveals that many species begin to taper off seed production once they hit a certain size.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, MARTINWIMMER

The Literature

Image of fruit fly epithelial cells (pseudo colored in this micrograph)
Epithelial Cell Signaling Helps Maintain Tissue Integrity
Annie Melchor | Nov 1, 2021
Using a transgenic fruit fly model, researchers demonstrate how epithelial barriers are maintained in living organisms despite high levels of cell turnover and death.
Image of nerve fibers shown in green and red
Neurons Simplify Visual Signals by Responding to Only One Retina
Anne N. Connor | Oct 1, 2021
Mice have neurons that connect to both eyes but only propagate the signal from one or the other, simplifying the information sent to the cerebral cortex.
Illustration of a brain on a clock with a figure of a man moving the clock arms
Human “Time Cells” Encode, Process Flow of Time
Anne N. Connor | Oct 1, 2021
Neurons in the hippocampus store information on the timing of experiences in addition to their content, helping to mediate sequential memory recall, a new study shows.
Immunofluorescence image of human tenocytes (cell nuclei in blue, actin in red) with PIEZO1 protein labeled in green (Scale bar: 20 ?m)
Mechanosensory Protein Helps Tendons Stiffen After Exercise
Catherine Offord | Sep 1, 2021
Researchers identify a role for PIEZO1 in tendon adaptation, and show that people with certain versions of the Piezo1 gene tend to be better jumpers.
A microscopy image of several endometrial stromal fibroblasts
Gene Offers Clue to How Human Labor Starts
Christie Wilcox | Aug 1, 2021
Genes associated with preterm birth and protecting the fetus from the mother’s immune system appear to be regulated by HAND2.
Infographic: How Pregnancy Changes Fat Tissue
Catherine Offord | Aug 1, 2021
Researchers propose a mechanism by which a protein produced in the placenta may trigger blood vessel growth and enlarge fat cells.
Stress Paralyzes Immune Cells
Emma Yasinski | Jul 1, 2021
Scientists show that an influx of noradrenaline can halt immune cells in mice.
colonies of mold growing on a Petri dish
Fungi Squeezed Through Microchannels Offer Clues to Cell Growth
Catherine Offord | Jun 1, 2021
A study finds that fast-growing species are stymied by narrow gaps, while slower-growing species can pass through and continue extending.
When Pursuing Prey, Bats Tune Out the World
Lisa Winter | May 1, 2021
As they close in for the kill, the flying mammals use quieter echolocation to focus on the chase.
Aphid Salivary Gene May Regulate Gall Color
Asher Jones | May 1, 2021
Whether the galls that aphids make on witch hazel leaves are red or green is associated with a gene expressed in the insects’ salivary glands.
Macrophages of the Human Eye Come into Focus
Ashley Yeager | Mar 1, 2021
Imaged in real time in living people, immune cells at the surface of the retina could serve as biomarkers to detect retinal and possibly neurological diseases and track their progression.
Petunia’s Waxy Cuticle Regulates the Plant’s Sweet Smell
Ashley Yeager | Feb 1, 2021
The thicker the flower petals’ cuticle, the more fragrance compounds the plant releases, according to a recent study.
How RNAs Called SINEUPs Upregulate Translation
Catherine Offord | Jan 1, 2021
The recently discovered long noncoding RNAs seem to boost the production of specific proteins in the cell by interacting with RNA-binding proteins, researchers find.
Immune Genes Protect Cells from Ebola Virus and SARS-CoV-2
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Dec 1, 2020
A pathway involved in the adaptive immune system, a relative newcomer in the world of pathogen defense, may have a more ancient role in protecting cells from invading viruses.
Herbivore Body Size Influences Grazing Behavior, Poop Quality
Catherine Offord | Nov 1, 2020
Researchers disentangle complex connections among vegetation, herbivores, and dung in the South African savanna.
Tropical Birds Differ in Their Responses to Drought
Shawna Williams | Nov 1, 2020
Long-lived species decrease their reproduction more than short-lived species in response to lower-than-normal precipitation, and thereby gain a survival advantage, a study finds.
How a Centipede Survives its Own Species’ Venom
Shawna Williams | Nov 1, 2020
The same toxin targets different receptors in prey and conspecifics to deliver either a lethal or non-lethal blow.
Infographic: How Weight Lifting Changes Monkeys’ Neural Connections
Jef Akst | Oct 1, 2020
After weeks of training, the muscles of two macaques exhibited greater responses to stimulation of the reticulospinal tract in the brain stem than they had before, suggesting that strengthening the neural pathway is key to getting stronger. 
Neural Connections Bolstered in Monkeys That Lift Weights
Jef Akst | Oct 1, 2020
A study in two macaques reveals the importance of increasing connectivity between muscles and the reticulospinal tract that runs from the brain stem down the spinal cord.