A micrograph from the first US case of COVID-19, with SARS-CoV-2 virus particles in blue
SARS-CoV-2 Can Spread Via Cell-to-Cell Transmission
The virus’s ability to slip directly from one cell to another may help it avoid some of the body’s immune responses.
ABOVE: Hannah A Bullock, Azaibi Tamin
SARS-CoV-2 Can Spread Via Cell-to-Cell Transmission
SARS-CoV-2 Can Spread Via Cell-to-Cell Transmission

The virus’s ability to slip directly from one cell to another may help it avoid some of the body’s immune responses.

The virus’s ability to slip directly from one cell to another may help it avoid some of the body’s immune responses.

ABOVE: Hannah A Bullock, Azaibi Tamin

transmission

A young white-tailed deer in the snow
Possible Case of Deer-To-Human SARS-CoV-2 Transmission
Catherine Offord | Mar 3, 2022
Canadian researchers identify a highly mutated variant of the virus in white-tailed deer and link it to a human COVID-19 case in the region—though they emphasize that the infection risk to people is low.
masked teacher sitting on floor showing masked students something on a tablet
Does Science Support Lifting School Mask Mandates?
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Feb 28, 2022
The CDC has given the OK to lift indoor mask mandates in much of the US, and a growing number of states no longer require face coverings in schools. But most experts agree that masks slow school spread of SARS-CoV-2, and whether now is the right time to allow teachers and students to unmask is a matter of debate.
Battling COVID-19 with Genomics
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Sep 24, 2020
Download this eBook to discover how genomic sequencing is uncovering new information about the SARS-CoV-2 virus and aiding public health decision making in the fight against a global pandemic!
Illustration of SARS-CoV-2 virus in red and blue
Scientists Investigate Omicron Subvariant BA.2
Catherine Offord | Jan 28, 2022
This strain of SARS-CoV-2 is causing new outbreaks in Europe and Asia and may spread slightly faster than the better-known BA.1 Omicron subvariant, although it’s too early to say for sure.
Isolated Realistic Coronavirus Covid-19 Molecule in a Biological Environment stock photo
Tweak to N Protein Makes Delta Variant More Infectious
Chloe Tenn | Nov 5, 2021
Using a novel lab technique, researchers identified a mutation that allows the virus to insert more genetic material into host cells.
Deer at grass field with autumn trees at the background stock photo
Researchers Detect Coronavirus in Iowa Deer
Chloe Tenn | Nov 3, 2021
Multiple white tailed deer tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 likely transmitted from humans, a study finds, indicating the species could act as a reservoir for the virus.
Computer scientist Ashok Srinivasan masked in front of a plane
Random Plane Boarding Minimizes COVID-19 Risk: Study
Christie Wilcox | Apr 27, 2021
A modeling study of boarding behavior finds filling the plane from back to front extends the close contact time between passengers and therefore increases the risks posed by air travel.
Q&A: Data Gaps Hinder Monitoring of SARS-COV-2 Variants
Jef Akst | Mar 24, 2021
Martha Nelson of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases talks about the need to balance data sharing and patient privacy concerns when tracking the spread of variants.
Second Person Dies in Latest Ebola Outbreak in DRC
Catherine Offord | Feb 11, 2021
The woman may have had a link to another person, who was married to an Ebola survivor and who died a few days previously in Democratic Republic of Congo.
escape mutant vaccine resistance covid-19 sars-cov-2 sars2 coronavirus pandemic evolution variants antibodies neutralizing
Will Delaying Vaccine Doses Cause a Coronavirus Escape Mutant?
Chris Baraniuk | Feb 4, 2021
With many millions of people waiting several weeks to receive a second COVID-19 vaccine dose in some countries, experts consider the possibility that SARS-CoV-2 could evolve vaccine resistance.
Pregnant COVID-19 Patients
The Scientist Staff | Jan 11, 2021
See a news report on a study of expectant mothers with SARS-CoV-2 infections.
Human Fetuses Can Contract SARS-CoV-2, but It’s Rare
Ashley Yeager | Jan 1, 2021
Compared with Zika and cytomegalovirus, the virus that causes COVID-19 appears to have a harder time penetrating the placenta and moving to a woman’s unborn baby.
Infographic: How SARS-CoV-2 Might Travel from Mom to Fetus
Ashley Yeager | Jan 1, 2021
The virus rarely spreads from mother to child before birth, but it can—and researchers are starting to investigate the path it takes.
COVID-19 May Have Arrived in US in December: Study
Max Kozlov | Dec 2, 2020
SARS-CoV-2 antibodies detected in blood donor samples indicate infections could have occurred in the US more than a month before the first confirmed case, but some experts remain skeptical.
SARS-CoV-2 Genetic Variant May Be More Transmissible
Abby Olena | Nov 25, 2020
The so-called 614G mutation in the viral spike protein does not appear to cause more severe cases of COVID-19, but multiple studies indicate that it could be more contagious.
Q&A: COVID-19 Infectiousness Peaks Early in Sickness, Study Shows
Max Kozlov | Nov 23, 2020
Patients’ viral loads are highest within five days of their first symptoms, emphasizing the need to isolate early to prevent transmission.
Q&A: Minks Can Transmit SARS-CoV-2 to Humans, Study Shows
Max Kozlov | Nov 13, 2020
Whole genome sequencing of the virus infecting the farm animals showed that it spread from the workers to the mink and back, indicating that an animal could serve as a viral reservoir.
Ferret Study Reinforces Role of Aerosols in SARS-CoV-2 Spread
Max Kozlov | Oct 28, 2020
Using an elaborate apparatus, researchers find that the virus spreads via aerosolized particles between ferrets more than a meter apart.
COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, coronavirus, pandemic, transmission, superspread, genome, virus, tracking, Biogen, Massachusetts
Thousands of Coronavirus Infections Stemmed from a Biotech Event
Amanda Heidt | Aug 26, 2020
Officials had initially linked 97 cases to a single conference held by Biogen in February in Boston, but a new study tracking viral genomes suggests the number may be as high as 20,000.