About Us

Meet This Issue's Writers
Meet This Issue's Writers
Stephen Wolniak knows the bad side of exposure on the Web, as you can read on page 10. After he was misidentified on an online message board, he was forced to change his number and consult lawyers. None of this, however, has kept him from his research and teaching, answering questions online about mitosis or, in his latest pursuit, a gallery of digital photos of plants and other species available at http://www.pbase.com/sigmasd9/steve_wolniak.Qiagen CEO Peer Schatz may have inherited his mitocho

Editorial

Come Together
Come Together
Biology is getting bigger.

Letter

That Alpha Error
That Alpha Error
In "On Downsizing the Status of Science," Dave Britton writes "... Truth is only what scientists can get each other to agree is true.
A Shocking Way to Deliver RNA
A Shocking Way to Deliver RNA
Re: "RNA Therapeutics Enter Clinical Trials."1 We are involved in nucleic acids delivery by electrical methods in vitro as well as in vivo. We were a little bit puzzled that this approach was not covered, as we have found it a very efficient way to obtain a safe targeted delivery in specific organs.2 Gene silencing by siRNA following its electrical delivery has been achieved in muscles,34 while other reports have described results in retina5 and in the brain.6 Electrical drug delivery – so
Too Many 'Omics
Too Many 'Omics
It is an old maxim that if you want to get on, invent a new word for your particular niche in an old area, and so become an instant expert.
FISH Beats Molecular Karyotyping
FISH Beats Molecular Karyotyping
We would like to comment on John Ashkenas' recent article on molecular karyotyping in the Jan. 17, 2005, issue of The Scientist.1 We attended the American Society of Human Genetics meeting as well and came away with a different impression of molecular karyotyping. While this technique will eventually and undoubtedly reveal new insights into human genome structure and copy-number variation, the data are still quite noisy and often unconvincing. Indeed, this copy-number variation is probably the s

Opinion

Ensnared in the Web
Ensnared in the Web
On April 30, 2003, my office phone rang.

Notebook

The coronavirus research renaissance
The coronavirus research renaissance
The post-SARS rush of research on human coronaviruses (CoVs) might not result in an immediate cure for SARS.
Communicating through movies
Communicating through movies
When the Huygens probe landed on Titan last month, astrobiologists were realistic about what they hoped to gain from the mission.
Stem cell battle in Nebraska
Stem cell battle in Nebraska
Nebraska has been a "red state" for decades, but Nebraska state senator Joel Johnson, a Republican and former surgeon, was bothered by Senate colleagues' attempts in recent years to pass a bill banning somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT).

Feature

MAbs Turn 30
MAbs Turn 30
hler, two researchers at the Medical Research Council's (MRC) Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, were investigating the mechanisms underlying the remarkable diversity of antibodies.
Therapeutic MAbs: Saving Lives and Making Billions
Therapeutic MAbs: Saving Lives and Making Billions
In 1895 two French physicians attempted a radical departure from the standard cancer treatment regimen.

Research

Love is Like an Addiction
Love is Like an Addiction
Neuroscientists today are peering into the brain to understand the drive of romantic love, and they are finding evidence backing the 19th-century philosopher's observation: Love has a striking neural kinship with drug addiction.

Hot Paper

Giving a Nod2 the Right Target
Giving a Nod2 the Right Target
Nod1 and Nod2 are no strangers to Hot Papers.

Vision

Challenging Dose-Response Dogma
Challenging Dose-Response Dogma
The central pillar upon which toxicological assessments are built is the dose-response relationship.
Life Sciences in the 21st Century
Life Sciences in the 21st Century
In many ways the laboratory tools we use today may remind us of computers in the late 1970s.

Briefs

Enzyme governs nerve polarity
Enzyme governs nerve polarity
), governs axon and dendrite growth in determining cell polarity, according to research groups from China and Japan.
sex life revealed
sex life revealed
, an ancient protist long considered to be asexual, may have a sex life.
Natural selection in humans
Natural selection in humans
Researchers at deCODE Genetics in Reykjavik, Iceland, have discovered a large chromosomal rearrangement in the human genome that appears to have been selected for in some European populations.1The rearrangement, a 900-kilobase inversion polymorphism at chromosome 17q21.31, appears in two lineages, H1 and H2, that have diverged for as many as 3 million years with no evidence of having recombined. The H2 lineage – rare in Africans, almost nonexistent in East Asians, but found in 20% of Europ

Technology

Mind Over Machines
Mind Over Machines
Imagine controlling a computer with just your mind.
Measuring Cytokine Gene Expression
Measuring Cytokine Gene Expression
The immune system is often likened to the military.

Tools and Technology

Arraying Oligo Probes at cDNA Lengths
Arraying Oligo Probes at cDNA Lengths
of Hamburg, Germany, has blurred the lines between cDNA and oligonucleotide probes.
Antibody Microarrays Highlight Enzyme Activity
Antibody Microarrays Highlight Enzyme Activity
When it comes to enzymes, protein abundance does not necessarily translate into protein activity: Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation can dramatically alter enzyme function.
Confocal Microscopes Go LIVE
Confocal Microscopes Go LIVE
new LSM 5 LIVE confocal microscope system may be the equivalent of moving from flip books to movie cameras.
Coral Harvest Yields Fluorescent Light Switch
Coral Harvest Yields Fluorescent Light Switch
Courtesy of Atsushi MiyawakiA group of researchers at RIKEN in Japan have developed a fluorescent protein that can be switched on and off more than 100 times.1 Atsushi Miyawaki and colleagues engineered monomeric fluorescent protein 22Gm3 (renamed "Dronpa") from the coral Pectiniidae and found that strong irradiation at 488 nm converts it to a nonfluorescent state absorbing at 390 nm. This darkened protein can be switched back to its original emission state by irradiation for several minutes at

BioBusiness

Manufacturing on a Grand Scale
Manufacturing on a Grand Scale
Biotech drugs such as genetically engineered hormones and monoclonal antibodies make up a sizeable and growing proportion of the pharmaceutical market.
New Rotavirus Vaccines on the Horizon
New Rotavirus Vaccines on the Horizon
Angela Howard was concerned when her infant daughter stopped crying, despite repeated jabs with an IV needle.
Postdocs Tangled Up in Red Tape
Postdocs Tangled Up in Red Tape
More that three years after Sept. 11, 2001, researchers and scholars who wish to come to America to study, conduct research, or attend scientific meetings are still feeling the reverberations of that day.

Best Places to Work

Best Places To Work For Postdocs: 2005
Best Places To Work For Postdocs: 2005
asks postdocs from the United States, Canada, and Europe to reveal how they feel about their jobs, and this year more than 3,500 answered the call.
Best Places to Work for Postdocs: Institutional Reports
Best Places to Work for Postdocs: Institutional Reports
Courtesy of Justin Smith, UNC-Chapel HillInstitutional ReportsCustomized reports are available in PDF form for the following institutions. Click on an institution name to access the report.Readers are advised to study the survey methodology to assist in interpreting the reports.If you do not see an institution listed, please e-mail postdocsurvey@the-scientist.com to find out if it is available.US InstitutionsCedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los AngelesCenters for Disease Control and Prevention, Atla
Top Spots For US Postdocs
Top Spots For US Postdocs
Five government organizations, four universities, three private institutes, two cancer centers, and one hospital.
Changes in 2005 could help EU Postdocs
Changes in 2005 could help EU Postdocs
Postdocs in Canada and Europe are a lot like their compatriots in the United States.

Reverse Transcript

The Egg Man
The Egg Man
In John Eppig's world, the egg reigns supreme.