News

Alternative And Conventional Biomedical Research: A Creative Synergy
Alternative And Conventional Biomedical Research: A Creative Synergy
Editor's Note: This first part of a two-part series charts the shared ground between research into alternative medical therapies and basic biomedical research. Increasingly, researchers are using powerful cellular and molecular tools to uncover biochemical pathways that may, for example, explain increasingly evident mind-body connections in health and illness. The second part, to appear in the March 21 issue, will explore efforts t
Newest Environmental Science Programs Build On A Broader Definition Of `Green'
Newest Environmental Science Programs Build On A Broader Definition Of `Green'
Researchers at many U.S. universities are participating in curricula that now stress hard science Top colleges and universities throughout the United States are responding to an unprecedented demand for environmental education programs with new undergraduate degree programs, graduate-level research opportunities, and environmental colloquia. What distinguishes most of these new programs from academia's previous environmental offer
Carnegie Institution's NSF Award Gives Boost To Science Education
Carnegie Institution's NSF Award Gives Boost To Science Education
Under a five-year grant, teachers and scientists will share in an effort to stimulate student interest in science Scientists, educators, and policymakers are giving high marks to a recently announced National Science Foundation grant aimed at improving science teaching in Washington, D.C.-area elementary schools. The five-year, $3.7 million grant awarded to the Carnegie Institution, located in Washington, will be used to create a
Alternative And Conventional Biomedical Research: A Creative Synergy
Alternative And Conventional Biomedical Research: A Creative Synergy
Editor's Note: This first part of a two-part series charts the shared ground between research into alternative medical therapies and basic biomedical research. Increasingly, researchers are using powerful cellular and molecular tools to uncover biochemical pathways that may, for example, explain increasingly evident mind-body connections in health and illness. The second part, to appear in the March 21 issue, will explore efforts t
Carnegie Institution's NSF Award Gives Boost To Science Education
Carnegie Institution's NSF Award Gives Boost To Science Education
Under a five-year grant, teachers and scientists will share in an effort to stimulate student interest in science Scientists, educators, and policymakers are giving high marks to a recently announced National Science Foundation grant aimed at improving science teaching in Washington, D.C.-area elementary schools. The five-year, $3.7 million grant awarded to the Carnegie Institution, located in Washington, will be used to create a
Newest Environmental Science Programs Build On A Broader Definition Of `Green'
Newest Environmental Science Programs Build On A Broader Definition Of `Green'
Researchers at many U.S. universities are participating in curricula that now stress hard science Top colleges and universities throughout the United States are responding to an unprecedented demand for environmental education programs with new undergraduate degree programs, graduate-level research opportunities, and environmental colloquia. What distinguishes most of these new programs from academia's previous environmental offer
Report: Gender, Ethnic Diversity Coming Slowly To Science
Report: Gender, Ethnic Diversity Coming Slowly To Science
Professional Women and Minorities: A Total Human Resources Data Compendium, published in January. The statistical compendium shows that a significant number of women are getting higher educational degrees (54 percent of bachelor's and master's degrees in all fields in 1991 were obtained by women), but are still represented relatively poorly in the natural sciences and engineering, compared with their male counterparts, earning betwe
Report: Gender, Ethnic Diversity Coming Slowly To Science
Report: Gender, Ethnic Diversity Coming Slowly To Science
Professional Women and Minorities: A Total Human Resources Data Compendium, published in January. The statistical compendium shows that a significant number of women are getting higher educational degrees (54 percent of bachelor's and master's degrees in all fields in 1991 were obtained by women), but are still represented relatively poorly in the natural sciences and engineering, compared with their male counterparts, earning betwe
NEW MANUAL EMPHASIZES EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS
NEW MANUAL EMPHASIZES EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS
NEW MANUAL EMPHASIZES EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS Author: Karen Young Kreeger Date: March 7, 1994 Science education in the United States is in the midst of a major reform movement, scientists and educators say; it is also, some of them warn, in crisis. "We have a tremendous national problem," says Bruce Alberts, president of the National Academy of Sciences. "We are so far away from where we should be with regard to the s
NEW MANUAL EMPHASIZES EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS
NEW MANUAL EMPHASIZES EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS
NEW MANUAL EMPHASIZES EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS Author: Karen Young Kreeger Date: March 7, 1994 Science education in the United States is in the midst of a major reform movement, scientists and educators say; it is also, some of them warn, in crisis. "We have a tremendous national problem," says Bruce Alberts, president of the National Academy of Sciences. "We are so far away from where we should be with regard to the s

Leaders of Science

Dorin Schumacher
Dorin Schumacher
with offices in West Lafayette, Ind. Dorin Schumacher, president of The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research Inc. (CPBR), views her organization as a unique model that fosters interaction among university, industry, and federal laboratories. Founded in Illinois in 1985, the consortium, which has members from across the United States, seeks to strengthen the nation's competitive position in the global biotechnology market by
Dorin Schumacher
Dorin Schumacher
with offices in West Lafayette, Ind. Dorin Schumacher, president of The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research Inc. (CPBR), views her organization as a unique model that fosters interaction among university, industry, and federal laboratories. Founded in Illinois in 1985, the consortium, which has members from across the United States, seeks to strengthen the nation's competitive position in the global biotechnology market by

Opinion

Education Partnerships Foster Students' Science Literacy
Education Partnerships Foster Students' Science Literacy
To help remedy this situation, many scientists these days are taking time to share their world--and themselves--with teachers and students from kindergarten through high school. These scientists have a variety of motives: Some simply want to provide assistance in response to a pressing need; they are expressing a concern for providing the next generation of scientists and technicians. Others are seeking a way to reciprocate for the
Education Partnerships Foster Students' Science Literacy
Education Partnerships Foster Students' Science Literacy
To help remedy this situation, many scientists these days are taking time to share their world--and themselves--with teachers and students from kindergarten through high school. These scientists have a variety of motives: Some simply want to provide assistance in response to a pressing need; they are expressing a concern for providing the next generation of scientists and technicians. Others are seeking a way to reciprocate for the

Letter

Animals In Research, 2
Animals In Research, 2
The use of animals in experiments is not closely regulated by local, state, and federal committees. The Animal Welfare Act pertains mainly to space, shelter, food, water, and cleanliness in laboratories. It does not protect animals in experiments. In fact, the administration of painkillers can be waived if an experimenter feels it might conflict with the experiment. In 1985, the United States General Accounting Office reported that
Animals In Research
Animals In Research
Anesthesia and analgesia are not the rule; in fact, in most forms of research they are the exception. If the experimenter chooses not to use painkillers, they are not required. Most experimenters choose not to use the anesthesia and analgesia to cut expenses. Hubel states: "A student in a few hours at the library can come up with a long list of medical successes resulting from animal research ...." A student in a few hours at the l
SSC Shutdown
SSC Shutdown
The Scientist, Nov. 29, 1993, page 12) apparently feels that anyone who didn't support the superconducting supercollider (SSC) lacked the "reasonable science savvy" to "vote correctly" on the matter. This sounds like the tired old argument: "You must not understand the issue or you would agree with me." No one is going to argue that the knowledge the SSC could provide is not worth obtaining. But just because something is worth doing
SSC Shutdown
SSC Shutdown
The Scientist, Nov. 29, 1993, page 12) apparently feels that anyone who didn't support the superconducting supercollider (SSC) lacked the "reasonable science savvy" to "vote correctly" on the matter. This sounds like the tired old argument: "You must not understand the issue or you would agree with me." No one is going to argue that the knowledge the SSC could provide is not worth obtaining. But just because something is worth doing
Animals In Research
Animals In Research
Anesthesia and analgesia are not the rule; in fact, in most forms of research they are the exception. If the experimenter chooses not to use painkillers, they are not required. Most experimenters choose not to use the anesthesia and analgesia to cut expenses. Hubel states: "A student in a few hours at the library can come up with a long list of medical successes resulting from animal research ...." A student in a few hours at the l
Animals In Research, 2
Animals In Research, 2
The use of animals in experiments is not closely regulated by local, state, and federal committees. The Animal Welfare Act pertains mainly to space, shelter, food, water, and cleanliness in laboratories. It does not protect animals in experiments. In fact, the administration of painkillers can be waived if an experimenter feels it might conflict with the experiment. In 1985, the United States General Accounting Office reported that

Commentary

The Clinton Administration's Mixed Messages On Biomedical Research And Innovation
The Clinton Administration's Mixed Messages On Biomedical Research And Innovation
In his eloquent speech, the president said reform should "strengthen what is good about our health-care system--the world's best health-care professionals, cutting edge research, and wonderful research institutions." I agree. The United States is the world leader in biomedical research and innovation. At a breathtaking pace, our scientists and laboratories produce new drugs, medical devices, and surgical techniques that prolong and
The Clinton Administration's Mixed Messages On Biomedical Research And Innovation
The Clinton Administration's Mixed Messages On Biomedical Research And Innovation
In his eloquent speech, the president said reform should "strengthen what is good about our health-care system--the world's best health-care professionals, cutting edge research, and wonderful research institutions." I agree. The United States is the world leader in biomedical research and innovation. At a breathtaking pace, our scientists and laboratories produce new drugs, medical devices, and surgical techniques that prolong and

Research

Citation Analysis Reveals Organic Chemistry's Most Active Research
Citation Analysis Reveals Organic Chemistry's Most Active Research
Following is Science Watch's report, written for the newsletter by John Emsley, who is a science writer in residence at the department of chemistry, Imperial College, London. The article is reprinted here with permission of Science Watch and ISI. Rank 1988 Total Citations 1 E.N. Jacobsen, I. Marko, W.S. Mungall, G. 154 Schroder, K.B. Sharpless, "Asymmetric dihydroxylation via ligand-accelerated catalysis," Journal of the Ame
Citation Analysis Reveals Organic Chemistry's Most Active Research
Citation Analysis Reveals Organic Chemistry's Most Active Research
Following is Science Watch's report, written for the newsletter by John Emsley, who is a science writer in residence at the department of chemistry, Imperial College, London. The article is reprinted here with permission of Science Watch and ISI. Rank 1988 Total Citations 1 E.N. Jacobsen, I. Marko, W.S. Mungall, G. 154 Schroder, K.B. Sharpless, "Asymmetric dihydroxylation via ligand-accelerated catalysis," Journal of the Ame

Hot Paper

Immunology
Immunology
J.G. Bodmer, S.G.E. Marsh, E.D. Albert, W.F. Bodmer, B. Dupont, H.A. Erlich, B. Mach, W.R. Mayr, P. Parham, T. Sasazuki, G.M.Th. Schreuder, J.L. Strominger, A. Svej-gaard, P.I. Terasaki, "Nomenclature for factors of the HLA system, 1991," Tissue Antigens, 39:161-73, 1992. Julia G. Bodmer (Tissue Antigen Laboratory, Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London): "`The dull catalogue of common things.' These words of the 19th-century English
Cell Biology
Cell Biology
S.M. Thomas, M. DeMarco, G. D'Arcangelo, S. Halegoua, J.S. Brugge, "Ras is essential for nerve growth factor- and phorbol ester-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of MAP kinases,"Cell, 68:1031-40, 1992. Joan S. Brugge (Ariad Pharmaceuticals Inc., Cambridge, Mass.): "Growth factor activation of receptor protein tyrosine kinases induces tyrosine phosphorylation of MAP kinases (MAPKs). MAPKs have been referred to as `switch' kinases, si
Cell Biology
Cell Biology
S.M. Thomas, M. DeMarco, G. D'Arcangelo, S. Halegoua, J.S. Brugge, "Ras is essential for nerve growth factor- and phorbol ester-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of MAP kinases,"Cell, 68:1031-40, 1992. Joan S. Brugge (Ariad Pharmaceuticals Inc., Cambridge, Mass.): "Growth factor activation of receptor protein tyrosine kinases induces tyrosine phosphorylation of MAP kinases (MAPKs). MAPKs have been referred to as `switch' kinases, si
Immunology
Immunology
J.G. Bodmer, S.G.E. Marsh, E.D. Albert, W.F. Bodmer, B. Dupont, H.A. Erlich, B. Mach, W.R. Mayr, P. Parham, T. Sasazuki, G.M.Th. Schreuder, J.L. Strominger, A. Svej-gaard, P.I. Terasaki, "Nomenclature for factors of the HLA system, 1991," Tissue Antigens, 39:161-73, 1992. Julia G. Bodmer (Tissue Antigen Laboratory, Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London): "`The dull catalogue of common things.' These words of the 19th-century English

Tools and Technology

Refinements In Bioluminescence Assays Expand Technique's Applications
Refinements In Bioluminescence Assays Expand Technique's Applications
The following vendors develop and/or market bioluminescence assay kits, products, and instrumentation for a variety of research and clinical laboratory uses. For more information about products, services, and prices, please contact these companies directly. Accurate Chemical and Scientific Corp. 300 Shames Dr. Westbury, N.Y. 11590 (800) 645-6264 - Fax: (516) 997-4948 Analytical Luminescence Laboratory 11760 Sorrento Valley Rd., S
Refinements In Bioluminescence Assays Expand Technique's Applications
Refinements In Bioluminescence Assays Expand Technique's Applications
The following vendors develop and/or market bioluminescence assay kits, products, and instrumentation for a variety of research and clinical laboratory uses. For more information about products, services, and prices, please contact these companies directly. Accurate Chemical and Scientific Corp. 300 Shames Dr. Westbury, N.Y. 11590 (800) 645-6264 - Fax: (516) 997-4948 Analytical Luminescence Laboratory 11760 Sorrento Valley Rd., S

New Products

New Products
New Products
Origin, from Micro- Cal Software Inc. of Northampton, Mass., is a Windows-based technical graphics and data-analysis application. Origin has the ability to process large data sets and has a variety of publication-quality graphic output options. It also offers multiple-plot windows and can produce multiple graphs on a single page; additionally, it can perform sophisticated scientific calculations, statistics, and curve fitting. Orig
New Products
New Products
Origin, from Micro- Cal Software Inc. of Northampton, Mass., is a Windows-based technical graphics and data-analysis application. Origin has the ability to process large data sets and has a variety of publication-quality graphic output options. It also offers multiple-plot windows and can produce multiple graphs on a single page; additionally, it can perform sophisticated scientific calculations, statistics, and curve fitting. Orig

Profession

New Program Helps Long Island Biotechnology Firms Obtain Funding
New Program Helps Long Island Biotechnology Firms Obtain Funding
Called the Technical Evaluation and Partnering Program, or TEP, the five-month-old effort was launched by a pair of institutions in the area--the Long Island Research Institute and the Center for Biotechnology at the State University of New York, Stony Brook. The program is designed to match local technology businesses with experienced researchers who can assist the companies in preparing their grant applications. Ultimately, its o
New Program Helps Long Island Biotechnology Firms Obtain Funding
New Program Helps Long Island Biotechnology Firms Obtain Funding
Called the Technical Evaluation and Partnering Program, or TEP, the five-month-old effort was launched by a pair of institutions in the area--the Long Island Research Institute and the Center for Biotechnology at the State University of New York, Stony Brook. The program is designed to match local technology businesses with experienced researchers who can assist the companies in preparing their grant applications. Ultimately, its o
People: Former Los Alamos Lab Chief Scientist Named Gordon Conferences' New Director, AAAS Honors Public Health Advocates; People Briefs: Shing-Tung Yau, Carold Hall, Jan Visser, Susan Kemnitzer; Obituary
People: Former Los Alamos Lab Chief Scientist Named Gordon Conferences' New Director, AAAS Honors Public Health Advocates; People Briefs: Shing-Tung Yau, Carold Hall, Jan Visser, Susan Kemnitzer; Obituary
Former Los Alamos Lab Chief Scientist Named Gordon Conferences' New Director AAAS Honors Public Health Advocates People Briefs Obituary - Arthur C. Giese Date: March 7, 1994, pp.22 Carl Storm, former chief scientist and program manager for technology development at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Explosives Technology and Application Division Office, has assumed the position of director of the Gordon Research Conferences.
People: Former Los Alamos Lab Chief Scientist Named Gordon Conferences' New Director, AAAS Honors Public Health Advocates; People Briefs: Shing-Tung Yau, Carold Hall, Jan Visser, Susan Kemnitzer; Obituary
People: Former Los Alamos Lab Chief Scientist Named Gordon Conferences' New Director, AAAS Honors Public Health Advocates; People Briefs: Shing-Tung Yau, Carold Hall, Jan Visser, Susan Kemnitzer; Obituary
Former Los Alamos Lab Chief Scientist Named Gordon Conferences' New Director AAAS Honors Public Health Advocates People Briefs Obituary - Arthur C. Giese Date: March 7, 1994, pp.22 Carl Storm, former chief scientist and program manager for technology development at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Explosives Technology and Application Division Office, has assumed the position of director of the Gordon Research Conferences.

Notebook

Notebook
Notebook
Probe Of Stewart And Feder Transfer Going to the Source NIH AIDS Office Head Named Does It Pay To Advertise? Scents And Sensibility Information Freebie Law Enforcement's Other 'Bug' Sen. Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) announced February 14 that the General Accounting Office had agreed to undertake an investigation of the April 1993 forced reassignments of Walter Stewart and Ned Feder at the National Institutes of Health. The int
Notebook
Notebook
Probe Of Stewart And Feder Transfer Going to the Source NIH AIDS Office Head Named Does It Pay To Advertise? Scents And Sensibility Information Freebie Law Enforcement's Other 'Bug' Sen. Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) announced February 14 that the General Accounting Office had agreed to undertake an investigation of the April 1993 forced reassignments of Walter Stewart and Ned Feder at the National Institutes of Health. The int