Image of the Day: Worm Rocket
Image of the Day: Worm Rocket
See the winners of the American Society for Cell Biology’s fluorescence imaging competition.
Image of the Day: Worm Rocket
Image of the Day: Worm Rocket

See the winners of the American Society for Cell Biology’s fluorescence imaging competition.

See the winners of the American Society for Cell Biology’s fluorescence imaging competition.

actin
Image of the Day: Actin Assembly
Image of the Day: Actin Assembly
Emily Makowski | Sep 17, 2019
Microtubules need actin to disassemble focal adhesions, allowing for cell movement.
Image of the Day: Organ Crosstalk
Image of the Day: Organ Crosstalk
Carolyn Wilke | Mar 19, 2019
Zooming in on the ovarioles of Drosophila could reveal links between muscles, nutrition, and the development of eggs.
Prachee Avasthi Explores How Cells Build and Maintain Cilia
Prachee Avasthi Explores How Cells Build and Maintain Cilia
Shawna Williams | Nov 30, 2018
The University of Kansas professor is also known for her leadership among early-career researchers.
Image of the Day: Artificial Cell
Image of the Day: Artificial Cell
Sukanya Charuchandra | May 31, 2018
Researchers made a synthetic cell that can photosynthesize and make proteins crucial for cellular structure. 
Image of the Day: Actin Burst
Image of the Day: Actin Burst
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Dec 6, 2017
Researchers are looking at actin polymerization and calcium uptake in human cells to study mitochondrial division.
Image of the Day: Cell Scaffolding
Image of the Day: Cell Scaffolding
The Scientist Staff | Feb 27, 2017
Human embryonic kidney cells use actin cytoskeletal networks to organize proteins on the surfaces of cell membranes.
May the Force Be with You
May the Force Be with You
Ning Wang | Jan 31, 2017
The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.
Infographic: Following the Force
Infographic: Following the Force
Ning Wang | Jan 31, 2017
Physical forces propagate from the outside of cells inward and vice versa.
Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground
Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground
The Scientist Staff | Dec 10, 2016
This collective migration, called durotaxis, depends on which cells get the best grip on a surface.