Early Humans’ Brains Were More Apelike than Modern
Early Humans’ Brains Were More Apelike than Modern
Impressions that ancient brains left in fossilized skulls reveal that the first human ancestors to migrate out of Africa had much more primitive brains than previously thought.
Early Humans’ Brains Were More Apelike than Modern
Early Humans’ Brains Were More Apelike than Modern

Impressions that ancient brains left in fossilized skulls reveal that the first human ancestors to migrate out of Africa had much more primitive brains than previously thought.

Impressions that ancient brains left in fossilized skulls reveal that the first human ancestors to migrate out of Africa had much more primitive brains than previously thought.

Australopithecus afarensis
Questions Raised About How an Ancient Hominin Moved
Questions Raised About How an Ancient Hominin Moved
Abby Olena | Feb 24, 2021
A new analysis of the hand of the 4.4-million-year-old partial skeleton of Ardipithecus ramidus indicates that the human ancestor may have climbed and swung through trees like chimpanzees do.
Image of the Day: Slow-Growing Brains
Image of the Day: Slow-Growing Brains
Amy Schleunes | Apr 8, 2020
Scans of eight fossilized adult and infant Australopithecus afarensis skulls reveal a prolonged period of brain growth during development that may have set the stage for extended childhood learning in later hominins.
<em>Australopithecus sediba</em> Not Likely Humans&rsquo; Ancestor: Study
Australopithecus sediba Not Likely Humans’ Ancestor: Study
Kerry Grens | May 9, 2019
The fossil record for the ancient hominin A. sediba is younger than that of Homo, a “highly unlikely” scenario for a direct lineage.
A New Human Ancestor?
A New Human Ancestor?
Bob Grant | May 28, 2015
Researchers in Ethiopia unearth a previously unknown species of hominin, which roamed Africa at the same time as “Lucy.”
Oldest <em>Homo</em> Remains Yet Found
Oldest Homo Remains Yet Found
Ruth Williams | Mar 4, 2015
A newly discovered 2.8 million-year-old jawbone is thought to be that of a direct human ancestor.
Acrobatic Ancestors?
Acrobatic Ancestors?
Beth Marie Mole | Oct 24, 2012
Amid controversy, hominin shoulder-bones suggest that our bipedal relatives still climbed trees.