cooperation
What Made Human Brains So Big?
What Made Human Brains So Big?
Ashley Yeager | May 24, 2018
Ecological challenges such as finding food and creating fire may have led the organ to become abnormally large, a new computer model suggests.
Image of the Day: Trade Deals
Image of the Day: Trade Deals
The Scientist Staff | Jan 25, 2017
The forces of supply and demand appear influence paper wasp (Polistes dominula) populations. When more nest options are available, helper wasps work fewer hours to earn membership in a colony.
On Becoming Human
On Becoming Human
Mary Beth Aberlin | Aug 1, 2016
Some thoughts on going to the Galápagos
Opinion: Monogamy and Cooperation Are Connected Through Multiple Links
Opinion: Monogamy and Cooperation Are Connected Through Multiple Links
David F. Westneat, Jacqueline R. Dillard | Aug 1, 2016
Why does cooperation evolve most often in monogamous animals?
Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating
Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating
Jenny Rood | Jul 1, 2016
An experimental evolution study shows that more cheaters arise when bread mold fungal cells are less related to one another.
Behavior Brief
Behavior Brief
Catherine Offord | Mar 25, 2016
A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research
Inventing Teamwork
Inventing Teamwork
The Scientist Staff | Jan 1, 2016
What can social networks among hunter-gatherers in Tanzania teach us about how cooperation evolved in human populations?
All Together Now
All Together Now
Mary Beth Aberlin | Jan 1, 2016
Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.
Contributors
Contributors
Karen Zusi | Jan 1, 2016
Meet some of the people featured in the January 2016 issue of The Scientist.
Maintaining Cooperation
Maintaining Cooperation
R. Ford Denison and Katherine Muller | Jan 1, 2016
How organisms keep their biological partners from cheating