Certain Color Varieties of a Coral Are More Protected from Bleaching
Certain Color Varieties of a Coral Are More Protected from Bleaching
In yellow-green and purple versions of the reef-building Acropora tenuis, the genes that code for particular fluorescent and other colorful proteins become more active in the summer, protecting symbiotic algae from thermal stress and resisting bleaching.
Certain Color Varieties of a Coral Are More Protected from Bleaching
Certain Color Varieties of a Coral Are More Protected from Bleaching

In yellow-green and purple versions of the reef-building Acropora tenuis, the genes that code for particular fluorescent and other colorful proteins become more active in the summer, protecting symbiotic algae from thermal stress and resisting bleaching.

In yellow-green and purple versions of the reef-building Acropora tenuis, the genes that code for particular fluorescent and other colorful proteins become more active in the summer, protecting symbiotic algae from thermal stress and resisting bleaching.

coral reefs
Q&A: Parachute Science in Coral Reef Research
Q&A: Parachute Science in Coral Reef Research
Asher Jones | Feb 24, 2021
Scientists who study the marine ecosystems have frequently failed to involve local researchers in projects, a study finds.
Coral Restorers
Coral Restorers
The Scientist Staff | Feb 1, 2021
See outplanted coral spawning in the wild thanks to the efforts of researchers at the Mote Marine Lab.
Slideshow: Restoring Coral Reefs
Slideshow: Restoring Coral Reefs
Hanna R. Koch, Erinn Muller, Michael P. Crosby | Feb 1, 2021
By growing mountainous star corals in the lab and outplanting them to dying reefs, we were able to grow sexually mature corals that could help reef recovery.
Restored Corals Spawn Hope for Reefs Worldwide
Restored Corals Spawn Hope for Reefs Worldwide
Hanna R. Koch, Erinn Muller, Michael P. Crosby | Feb 1, 2021
Novel technologies establish a new paradigm for global coral reef restoration, with in situ spawning of mature, environmentally resilient corals in five years instead of decades.
Infographic: How to Accelerate the Growth of Restored Corals
Infographic: How to Accelerate the Growth of Restored Corals
Hanna R. Koch, Erinn Muller, Michael P. Crosby | Feb 1, 2021
Our novel technique involves planting several small fragments of slow-growing corals onto dead coral heads. The fragments eventually fuse, forming a large colony in a fraction of the time that it takes wild corals to build reefs.
Contributors
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Feb 1, 2021
Meet some of the people featured in the February 2021 issue of The Scientist.
Image of the Day: Stress-Resistant Corals
Image of the Day: Stress-Resistant Corals
Emily Makowski | Sep 19, 2019
Some corals can adjust to a range of temperatures, but this ability may be limited in a consistently warmer environment.
Image of the Day: Synchronous Spawning
Image of the Day: Synchronous Spawning
Emily Makowski | Sep 9, 2019
Groups of corals release all of their eggs and sperm once a year, but the timing of their spawning is under threat from climate change.
Image of the Day: Cooperative Sponges
Image of the Day: Cooperative Sponges
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 15, 2019
Mycale grandis teams up with microbes housed inside it to gather nutrients.