Bat perching upside down in a cave.
Some Bats Buzz Like Hornets to Deter Predators
The behavior is the first example of a mammal mimicking a more-dangerous species.
ABOVE: Marco Scalisi
Some Bats Buzz Like Hornets to Deter Predators
Some Bats Buzz Like Hornets to Deter Predators

The behavior is the first example of a mammal mimicking a more-dangerous species.

The behavior is the first example of a mammal mimicking a more-dangerous species.

ABOVE: Marco Scalisi

field biology

A black and white photo of a man standing at a lab bench, holding up a glass jar
Reimagining Ecology, 1939
Lisa Winter | Apr 4, 2022
Edward Ricketts built his laboratory just onshore from the swirling tidepools of Monterey Bay, California, an ideal backdrop against which he developed a new system for studying the ecology of any given habitat.
Photo of a Jewel beetle <em>(Sternocera aequisignata)</em>.
Why Are Some Beetles Shiny? It’s Not What Researchers Thought
Connor Lynch | Mar 1, 2022
The glossy shell of some beetles, it has long been speculated, helps hide the insects from predators. A recent paper put the hypothesis to the test—and found it wanting.
school of fish
Making Waves and Avoiding Beaks
Chloe Tenn | Dec 23, 2021
Moving collectively on the water surface could help protect schools of fish from being eaten by predatory birds.
A woman sits with a camera and recording equipment looking up at a tree full of bats (unseen).
Baby Talk: Bat Pups Babble Like Human Infants
Annie Melchor | Aug 20, 2021
By studying the vocal behavior of 20 baby bats from birth to weaning, researchers have identified striking similarities between how young humans and bats develop communication skills.
an old wooden barn near charred grassland
Field Research Sites Damaged as Fires Ravage West Coast
Shawna Williams | Sep 11, 2020
Flames and smoke have killed dozens of people over the past month and burned hundreds of thousands of acres, causing massive disruptions.
a photo of Cusco, Peru, showing empty streets
Border Closing Strands Professors, Students in Peru
Shawna Williams | Mar 20, 2020
Under lockdown in a hotel, members of a plant ecology course continue to work and study as they seek a way to return home.
diving beetle eggs
Diving Beetle Adults and Larvae Dismember, Eat Tadpoles: Study
Catherine Offord | Jan 13, 2020
The invertebrate predators prey on and lay their eggs near emerging tadpoles, potentially threatening the conservation of endangered frogs, researchers find.
Warming Permafrost Morphs Microbes into Greenhouse Gas Emitters
Ashley Yeager | Nov 1, 2019
Insulating tundra soil with snow increased the abundance of microbial species involved in carbon dioxide and methane release.
Squirrels Listen to Birdsong for Safety Cues
Emily Makowski | Sep 5, 2019
Eastern gray squirrels appear to ease up on vigilance behavior when the birds sound calm.
Combination Strategy Nearly Eliminates Invasive Mosquitoes in Field
Abby Olena | Jul 17, 2019
Researchers use two techniques—Wolbachia infection and irradiation—to suppress reproduction in populations of Asian tiger mosquitoes at two study sites in China.
Dorothy Cheney, Pioneer in Social Cognition, Dies
Kerry Grens | Nov 19, 2018
Her work changed the discipline by bringing rigorous experimentation to field studies of monkeys and baboons.
Research Building Burns Down in Woolsey Fire
Kerry Grens | Nov 16, 2018
The structure was the cornerstone of a UCLA conservation science center.
Scientists Unite to Save “Monkey Island” After Hurricane Maria
Shawna Williams | Feb 1, 2018
Puerto Rico’s Cayo Santiago has hosted decades of research in cognition, primatology, immunization, and other areas.
Women Surveyed About Sexual Harassment Tell Their Stories
Katarina Zimmer | Dec 12, 2017
Marie Claire speaks with researchers who’d reported abuse in studies of harassment in the field.
Streakers, Poopers, and Performers: The Wilder Side of Wildlife Cameras
Kerry Grens | Apr 1, 2017
Human visitors to camera traps display, well, human behavior.
Orca Death Spurs Reevaluation of Satellite Tagging
Bob Grant | Oct 10, 2016
A cetacean succumbed to a fungal infection shortly after being darted by researchers seeking to learn more about the species’ migrations and population dynamics.