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Closeup of a pair of hands in blue gloves holding a white mouse and injecting it with an amber colored liquid.
Opioids Recruit the Immune System to Cause Withdrawal Symptoms
A study finds that T cells induced by heroin cross the blood-brain barrier to wreak havoc on the brain, hinting at new ways to prevent withdrawal.
Opioids Recruit the Immune System to Cause Withdrawal Symptoms
Opioids Recruit the Immune System to Cause Withdrawal Symptoms

A study finds that T cells induced by heroin cross the blood-brain barrier to wreak havoc on the brain, hinting at new ways to prevent withdrawal.

A study finds that T cells induced by heroin cross the blood-brain barrier to wreak havoc on the brain, hinting at new ways to prevent withdrawal.

health
An artist’s rendering of a DNA-based virus trap, represented as gray rods in a short cone-shaped arrangement. One is coated with blue molecules, likely antibodies, that adhere to a virus target. Another image shows to traps coming together to capture a red coronavirus.
“Origami” DNA Traps Could Keep Large Viruses From Infecting Cells
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Jan 18, 2023 | 4 min read
By engineering structures out of DNA, scientists could potentially prevent larger viruses, like coronaviruses and influenza viruses, from interacting with cells.
A green and white fish swimming underwater
Rockfish Genes Hold Clues to Human Longevity
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Jan 12, 2023 | 3 min read
By analyzing the genomes of 23 remarkably long-lived fish species, a study found two metabolic pathways associated with longevity.
800x560-aug-31-2021
Aging and Cancer: A Complex Relationship
The Scientist Creative Services Team | 2 min read
An expert panel will discuss how aging affects cancer risk, development, and treatment practices.
A collection of images from prior stories, including illustrations of DNA, chromosomes, and various cells, microscopy images of cancer cells, and a photo of a mouse on a treadmill.
Our Favorite Cancer Stories of 2022
Dan Robitzski | Dec 27, 2022 | 4 min read
This year, cancer researchers uncovered a variety of ways that tumors can survive and spread, ranging from damaging their own DNA to exploiting the nearby microenvironment for nutrients.
Illustration of HIV virus
Viral Protein Behind Chronic Inflammation in People with HIV: Study
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Dec 12, 2022 | 3 min read
The HIV protein Nef can cause long-term genetic changes that lead to hyperreactive immune cells, according to research in human cells and mice. 
The Scientist Speaks Podcast – Episode 4
The Scientist Creative Services Team | 1 min read
Hidden Hitchhikers: Lessons Learned from The Human Microbiome Project
person in white jacket putting bandaid on arm of child
Can We Predict How Well Someone Will Respond to a Vaccine?
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Nov 14, 2022 | 7 min read
Researchers find signatures pre- and post-vaccination that correlate with a more robust immune response. 
An iPhone screen with the app icons for Twitter and Mastodon side by side. Other apps are arranged in rows around them.
What’s the Future of Science Twitter?
Katherine Irving | Nov 11, 2022 | 2 min read
In the wake of Elon Musk’s takeover, many researchers are exploring their options with the open-source platform Mastodon.
Blue 3D illustration of X-shaped chromosomes
X Chromosome Silenced in Some Cancers in Males
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Nov 11, 2022 | 3 min read
A study finds that XIST, the gene that shuts down one X chromosome in people who have two, is linked to cancer in males. 
An excited-looking toddler crawls towards toys while her mother watches on.
Doctors Treat a Rare Genetic Condition Before Patient Is Born
Dan Robitzski | Nov 10, 2022 | 2 min read
Thanks to continued weekly medications, a 16-month-old girl shows no symptoms of a severe genetic disease that typically kills children before they turn two.
a person in a black shirt crouches on a dirt bank and cups water drawn from a river.
Cholera Outbreak Strikes 29 Countries, Highlights Vaccine Shortage
Katherine Irving | Oct 31, 2022 | 3 min read
The international group coordinating emergency vaccines recommends administering one dose instead of two to combat the “dire shortage” of cholera vaccines worldwide.
Orange colony of bacteria on red medium
Skin Bacteria May Trigger Lupus: Mouse Study
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Oct 28, 2022 | 3 min read
Staphylococcus aureus appears to be the culprit.
illustration of liver with veins in blue and arteries in red.
Ethanol-Making Microbe Tied to Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Oct 19, 2022 | 4 min read
A study adds to evidence linking gut bacteria to liver conditions in people who don’t drink excessive amounts of alcohol. 
a three star rating displays next to a bowl of fruits and vegetables with a stethoscope, scale, and other health and fitness supplies in the background.
5-Star Rating System Ranks the Validity of Health Advice
Katherine Irving | Oct 10, 2022 | 2 min read
The proposed tool aims to inject clarity into the often-murky science of health risk factors, but some experts are skeptical that it’ll succeed.
A photo of King Charles III, then formally Prince of Wales, wearing a dark suit, shown from the shoulders up.
The Unscientific King: Charles III’s History Promoting Homeopathy
Sophie Fessl, PhD | Sep 29, 2022 | 6 min read
King Charles III has a long history of promoting homeopathic or alternative medical treatments not supported by scientific evidence.
Illustration of light blue neurons with white amyloid plaques accumulating on their axons.
New Alzheimer’s Drug Slows Cognitive Decline in Clinical Trial
Dan Robitzski | Sep 28, 2022 | 2 min read
The Biogen-developed treatment, called lecanemab, appears to have a more clear-cut effect on slowing the disease than the company’s previous Alzheimer’s drug, Aduhelm.
white mouse sitting down
Drug Spurs Neuron Growth in Mice with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Sep 27, 2022 | 4 min read
A protein duo increases transcription of growth-related genes to enhance axon regeneration and boost plasticity, a study finds—but fails to improve mobility.
Illustration of pink and blue DNA molecules.
Historic Adaptations May Now Make Us Susceptible to Disease
Dan Robitzski | Sep 16, 2022 | 5 min read
Researchers made the find using an algorithm that purportedly distinguishes between mutations that were selected for and those that came along for the ride by coincidence, a feat that has long eluded scientists.
A surgical mask next to an open pill bottle that’s toppled over, spilling out red capsules meant to represent vitamin D supplements.
Vitamin D Likely Doesn’t Prevent COVID-19, Studies Find
Dan Robitzski | Sep 9, 2022 | 2 min read
The results from two large clinical trials don't support the idea that supplements of the vitamin bolster immune defenses against SARS-CoV-2.
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