A photo of King Charles III, then formally Prince of Wales, wearing a dark suit, shown from the shoulders up.
The Unscientific King: Charles III’s History Promoting Homeopathy
King Charles III has a long history of promoting homeopathic or alternative medical treatments not supported by scientific evidence.
The Unscientific King: Charles III’s History Promoting Homeopathy
The Unscientific King: Charles III’s History Promoting Homeopathy

King Charles III has a long history of promoting homeopathic or alternative medical treatments not supported by scientific evidence.

King Charles III has a long history of promoting homeopathic or alternative medical treatments not supported by scientific evidence.

health
Illustration of light blue neurons with white amyloid plaques accumulating on their axons.
New Alzheimer’s Drug Slows Cognitive Decline in Clinical Trial
Dan Robitzski | Sep 28, 2022
The Biogen-developed treatment, called lecanemab, appears to have a more clear-cut effect on slowing the disease than the company’s previous Alzheimer’s drug, Aduhelm.
white mouse sitting down
Drug Spurs Neuron Growth in Mice with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury
Natalia Mesa | Sep 27, 2022
A protein duo increases transcription of growth-related genes to enhance axon regeneration and boost plasticity, a study finds—but fails to improve mobility.
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Aging and Cancer: A Complex Relationship
The Scientist Creative Services Team
An expert panel will discuss how aging affects cancer risk, development, and treatment practices.
Illustration of pink and blue DNA molecules.
Historic Adaptations May Now Make Us Susceptible to Disease
Dan Robitzski | Sep 16, 2022
Researchers made the find using an algorithm that purportedly distinguishes between mutations that were selected for and those that came along for the ride by coincidence, a feat that has long eluded scientists.
A surgical mask next to an open pill bottle that’s toppled over, spilling out red capsules meant to represent vitamin D supplements.
Vitamin D Likely Doesn’t Prevent COVID-19, Studies Find
Dan Robitzski | Sep 9, 2022
The results from two large clinical trials don't support the idea that supplements of the vitamin bolster immune defenses against SARS-CoV-2.
The Scientist Speaks Podcast – Episode 4
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Hidden Hitchhikers: Lessons Learned from The Human Microbiome Project
Four study participants in t shirts and shorts sit around a table in a stainless steel chamber. All four are looking at personal electronics and wearing a breathing mask connected to a nearby machine via blue tubing.
A New Culprit in Air Pollution: Reactions Triggered by Human Skin
Shafaq Zia | Sep 2, 2022
Oil on human skin reacts with ozone to produce highly reactive radicals that can generate toxic airborne chemicals in indoor spaces.
Bright purple and orange lactobacillus bacteria.
How a Specific Gut Bacterium May Cause Type 1 Diabetes
Dan Robitzski | Aug 25, 2022
A bacterium that produces an insulin-like peptide can give mice type 1 diabetes, and infection with the microbe seems to predict the onset of the disease in humans, a study finds.
An illustration of a pregnant women wearing a mask, surrounded by microbes
How COVID-19 Affects Pregnancy
Amanda Heidt | Aug 16, 2022
Evidence thus far shows that pregnant people infected with SARS-CoV-2 are at higher risk for severe disease and death, as well as complications in their pregnancies.
A translucent illustration of the BA.2.75 subvariant of SARS-CoV-2 against a black background
Experts Mixed on Risk of “Centaurus” Omicron Subvariant
Dan Robitzski | Aug 15, 2022
BA.2.75 is spreading rampantly in India and has so far reached at least 20 other countries, but it doesn’t seem to be outcompeting other Omicron SARS-CoV-2 subvariants.
Artist’s rendition of light blue monkeypox viruses in front of a black background.
FDA To Stretch Monkeypox Vaccine Supply via Intradermal Injection
Shafaq Zia | Aug 12, 2022
The newly authorized intradermal vaccination only requires one-fifth of the usual vaccine dose. This will help stretch out the limited vaccine supply, experts say, but only if healthcare personnel receive sufficient training.
Four glass vials sit on a reflective tabletop next to a syringe. Each is labeled as a subsequent dose in a four-dose series of COVID-19 vaccines.
What We Know About Getting a Second Booster Shot of COVID-19 Vaccines
Dan Robitzski | Aug 11, 2022
Studies show that a fourth mRNA vaccine dose offers the elderly and other high-risk groups strong protection against hospitalization and death from COVID-19, but experts say benefits for other populations may be more limited.
Artist&rsquo;s rendition of multiple <em>Neisseria gonorrhoeae</em>, the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, depicted as two spheres stuck together, each covered in tendrils.
Gonorrhea-Blocking Mutation Also Protects Against Alzheimer’s: Study
Holly Barker | Aug 5, 2022
Research traces the evolution of a gene variant that reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, finding that it originally evolved in response to infectious bacteria.
Updated
the White House on a sunny day
Biden Names National Monkeypox Response Coordinator
Shawna Williams | Aug 2, 2022
FEMA official Robert Fenton and a deputy are charged with increasing access to tests, vaccines, and treatment.
Closeup of a person pouring several dietary supplement capsules into their open palm.
Vitamin D Pills Don’t Prevent Bone Fractures, Osteoporosis: Study
Dan Robitzski | Jul 28, 2022
A large trial adds to a growing list of conditions once thought to be helped by vitamin D supplementation.
Ribbon diagram of the protein coat of an adeno-associated virus
Preprints Propose Constellation of Causes for Kids’ Liver Disease
Christie Wilcox | Jul 25, 2022
Two independent groups suggest the suite of recent unexplained hepatitis cases may stem from coinfection with an adeno-associated virus and a helper adeno- or herpesvirus, a duo which may be especially virulent in children with a particular genetic variant.
Photo taken from the perspective of a lab worker in a white coat and purple gloves preparing multiple fecal transplant capsules at a time.
Banking Previous Poos: Could a Transplant of Feces from Your Past Heal You?
Dan Robitzski | Jun 30, 2022
The Scientist spoke with Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School researchers Scott Weiss and Yang-Yu Liu, who propose that people bank stool samples when they’re young and healthy so that they can be transplanted to rejuvenate the gut microbiome later on.
Artist&rsquo;s rendition of metastatic cancer cells with yellow nuclei and green cell bodies extending into blue tendrils.
While the Body Rests, Breast Cancer Spreads More Aggressively
Alejandra Manjarrez | Jun 23, 2022
More cancer cells are shed from primary tumors when individuals are asleep than when they’re awake, according to observations in mouse models and a small cohort of breast cancer patients.
Artist&rsquo;s rendering of aquamarine T cells in front of a blue and green background.
Study Links Stress to a Faster-Aging Immune System
Margaret Osborne | Jun 21, 2022
Health data from 5,744 adults over the age of 50 reveals an association between stressors such as discrimination and a relatively small proportion of younger infection-fighting immune cells.