A clinician (off screen) wearing blue gloves presses a diapered infant’s heel against a paper card to collect blood samples.
Did Researchers Really Uncover the Cause of SIDS?
An interesting but preliminary biomarker study’s reception illustrates the challenges of conducting and communicating nuanced research in the era of social media.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, ISAYILDIZ
Did Researchers Really Uncover the Cause of SIDS?
Did Researchers Really Uncover the Cause of SIDS?

An interesting but preliminary biomarker study’s reception illustrates the challenges of conducting and communicating nuanced research in the era of social media.

An interesting but preliminary biomarker study’s reception illustrates the challenges of conducting and communicating nuanced research in the era of social media.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, ISAYILDIZ

health

Woman in face shield and blue gown taking cotton swab of patient's mouth while patient sits inside of car
What You Should Know About New Omicron Subvariants
Natalia Mesa | May 17, 2022
The presence and spread of new, more-infectious and immune-evading variants show that the coronavirus is not done mutating.
A top-down view of bowls filled various high-fiber foods such as rice, corn, seeds, and cereal sitting on a wooden table.
Different Dietary Fibers Affect the Body in Unique Ways
Rachael Moeller Gorman | May 3, 2022
Acting through the microbiome, the fiber arabinoxylan reduces cholesterol in many people, while another fiber, called long-chain inulin, increases inflammation, a study finds.
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Aging and Cancer: A Complex Relationship
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Aug 11, 2021
An expert panel will discuss how aging affects cancer risk, development, and treatment practices.
Baby with spotted onsie about to get injection of vaccine
Antibiotics Tied to Lower Effectiveness of Childhood Vaccines
Natalia Mesa | Apr 28, 2022
Use of the drugs in children under the age of two was associated with lower antibody levels after the jabs—perhaps, researchers suggest, due to microbiome alterations.
Liver glowing red underneath human torso
Mysterious Hepatitis Cases Reported in Young Children
Natalia Mesa | Apr 18, 2022
Officials have ruled out known hepatitis viruses as the cause of a rash of illnesses in Europe and the US.
The Scientist Speaks Podcast – Episode 4
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Apr 28, 2020
Hidden Hitchhikers: Lessons Learned from The Human Microbiome Project
Tiled blue-gray MRI readouts of a human brain.
Cancer Tied to Reduced Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease
Dan Robitzski | Apr 14, 2022
Observational evidence for the connection is solidifying, and some clues are emerging about the mechanisms that may explain it.
Four white, circular pills balance on their side in front of a pink background.
Metformin Prescriptions Linked to Sons’ Birth Defects
Dan Robitzski | Mar 29, 2022
A new cohort study finds that boys whose fathers took the type 2 diabetes drug metformin three months before their conception were more likely to have a birth defect.
Electrode array, with needle-like electrodes facing upward
Brain Implant Allows Completely Paralyzed Patient to Communicate
Natalia Mesa | Mar 24, 2022
The patient, who has ALS, is able to communicate in complete sentences by deliberately altering his brain’s activity.
Man in lab coat sitting at a lab bench looking at small, stoppered beaker.
Cancer Researcher Donald Pinkel Dies at Age 95
Natalia Mesa | Mar 18, 2022
Unsatisfied by how treatments for childhood leukemia failed to prevent the disease’s return, Pinkel combined them all—and virtually cured the disease.
Child with head tilted back receiving oral polio vaccine
Mass Polio Vaccination Effort Underway in East Africa
Natalia Mesa | Mar 18, 2022
Malawi and its neighbors plan to vaccinate 9.4 million children against polio in the coming week to combat a suspected outbreak.
Book cover of Why We Love: The New Science Behind Our Closest Relationships
Book Excerpt from Why We Love
Anna Machin | Mar 14, 2022
In Chapter 1, “Survival,” author Anna Machin describes the health benefits of strong human bonds.
Black and white photograph of Stamler looking into the camera.
“Father of Preventive Cardiology” Jeremiah Stamler Dies at 102
Lisa Winter | Feb 18, 2022
He was among the first to identify lifestyle factors that contribute to cardiovascular disease.
Blue T cell with other blurred T cells in the background
Woman Seemingly Cured of HIV After Umbilical Cord Transplant
Natalia Mesa | Feb 16, 2022
Umbilical cord blood may be a good alternative to bone marrow transplants for treating HIV in patients with HIV and cancer.
Illustration of gray bacteriophages approaching and infecting a red and orange bacteria that has multiple fimbria protruding from it.
Bacteria-Infecting Viruses in Gut Microbiome Linked to Cognition
Dan Robitzski | Feb 16, 2022
Research in mice and flies suggests that bacteriophages, including those found in dairy foods, may have an influence on an animals’ ability to learn and remember information.
illustration of inside of human chest with highlighted gland between the lungs
Genetically Altered Mice Harness Benefits of Calorie Restriction  
Sophie Fessl | Feb 11, 2022
A study identifies a gene that appears to be partially responsible for the health effects of a limited diet.
A white coat-wearing doctor holds the results of an EKG test in one hand and traces over them with a pen in the other hand
Doctors and Researchers Probe How COVID-19 Attacks the Heart
Dan Robitzski | Jan 12, 2022
Experts have a decent grasp on how COVID-19 impacts cardiovascular health in the near term. The implications of long COVID, however, remain mysterious.
A clinician in a white lab coat sitting in a chair uses an arm cuff to measure the blood pressure of a pregnant patient sitting across from them.
RNA in Blood Predicts High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy
Dan Robitzski | Jan 6, 2022
Biomarkers in serum correlate with preeclampsia, a condition that can lead to fatal hypertension.
An artist’s rendering of the Omicron variant portrays the virus as a lumpy blue sphere with several orange spike proteins jutting out of it.
Omicron Propagates 70 Times Faster than Delta in Bronchi: Study
Dan Robitzski | Dec 17, 2021
A preprint reports that the new SARS-CoV-2 variant multiplies faster in human bronchial tissue but slower in lung tissue than the Delta variant, potentially explaining how it’s spreading from person to person so quickly.