human behavior
Humans are Making Mammals Return to the Night Life
Humans are Making Mammals Return to the Night Life
Ashley Yeager | Jun 14, 2018
While shifts in behavior could help wildlife and people coexist, they might also affect the animals’ survival.
NIH’s New Rules Governing Human Research Go Into Effect
NIH’s New Rules Governing Human Research Go Into Effect
Jim Daley | Jan 25, 2018
More than 3,500 scientists had signed an open letter to NIH Director Francis Collins opposing the rules change.
Mothers Are Hard-Wired to Respond Similarly to Infant Cries Across Cultures
Mothers Are Hard-Wired to Respond Similarly to Infant Cries Across Cultures
Shawna Williams | Jan 1, 2018
Researchers find consistent behaviors and brain activity in an international study.
How Moral Disgust Can Simultaneously Protect and Endanger Humanity
How Moral Disgust Can Simultaneously Protect and Endanger Humanity
Robert Sapolsky | Jun 1, 2017
The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.
Contributors
Contributors
Diana Kwon | Jun 1, 2017
Meet some of the people featured in the June 2017 issue of The Scientist.
Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>
Book Excerpt from Behave
Robert Sapolsky | May 31, 2017
In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.
Streakers, Poopers, and Performers: The Wilder Side of Wildlife Cameras
Streakers, Poopers, and Performers: The Wilder Side of Wildlife Cameras
Kerry Grens | Apr 1, 2017
Human visitors to camera traps display, well, human behavior.
Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality
Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality
Catherine Offord | Mar 1, 2017
Researchers are using multiple methods to study the origins of humans’ capacity to process and produce music, and there’s no shortage of debate about the results.
Cannibalism: Not That Weird
Cannibalism: Not That Weird
Bill Schutt | Feb 1, 2017
Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.
Opinion: Our Inner Caveman
Opinion: Our Inner Caveman
João Pedro de Magalhães | Aug 1, 2016
The modern human brain evolved in social and environmental settings very unlike today’s. Despite our cultural and technological progress, tribal instincts remain.