Composite image of earliest humans and wooly mammoths
New Evidence Complicates the Story of the Peopling of the Americas
New techniques have shown that people reached the New World far earlier than the long-standing estimate of 13,000 years ago, but scientists still debate exactly when humans arrived on the continent—and how.
ABOVE: composite from: © istock.com, Homunkulus28 ; © alamy.com, MARK GARLICK, SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY
New Evidence Complicates the Story of the Peopling of the Americas
New Evidence Complicates the Story of the Peopling of the Americas

New techniques have shown that people reached the New World far earlier than the long-standing estimate of 13,000 years ago, but scientists still debate exactly when humans arrived on the continent—and how.

New techniques have shown that people reached the New World far earlier than the long-standing estimate of 13,000 years ago, but scientists still debate exactly when humans arrived on the continent—and how.

ABOVE: composite from: © istock.com, Homunkulus28 ; © alamy.com, MARK GARLICK, SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

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