Co-mimic pairs from the species Heliconius erato (odd columns) and Heliconius melpomene (even column) sorted by greatest similarity from top left to bottom right
Image of the Day: ButterflyNet
Scientists used machine learning to analyze the coevolution of physical traits in butterflies.
Image of the Day: ButterflyNet
Image of the Day: ButterflyNet

Scientists used machine learning to analyze the coevolution of physical traits in butterflies.

Scientists used machine learning to analyze the coevolution of physical traits in butterflies.

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human macrophage
Image of the Day: Alzheimer’s Genes
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 19, 2019
Mutations within the MS4A gene cluster have been linked to changes in protein levels that affect disease risk.
The sponge Mycale grandis overgrowing coral on the reef in K?ne?ohe Bay
Image of the Day: Cooperative Sponges
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 15, 2019
Mycale grandis teams up with microbes housed inside it to gather nutrients.
sei proteins help protect flies from heat-induced seizures
Image of the Day: Seizure Proteins
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 14, 2019
The sei ion channel in fruit flies keeps their neuronal excitability in check.
glowing swell shark
Image of the Day: Fluorescent Sharks
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 13, 2019
A newfound family of metabolites emits green light in response to the blue light of the deep ocean, causing certain sharks to glow.
a gall midge larva leaping
Image of the Day: Legless Leaps
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 12, 2019
The goldenrod gall midge, a type of fly, bears larvae that can jump through the air despite their lack of limbs.
SLAP microscope
Image of the Day: Super Speedy Microscopy
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 9, 2019
Two-photon imaging captures chemical signaling between live mouse neurons on a millisecond timescale.
tweaking microbiome composition reduces colorectal tumor growth in mice
Image of the Day: Tamed Gut Bacteria
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 8, 2019
Curbing the growth of harmful bacteria in mouse microbiomes reduces the animals’ incidence of inflammation-related colorectal cancer.
smartphone controlled device implanted in mouse brain
Image of the Day: Smartphone-Controlled Brains
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 7, 2019
A device implanted into mice can modulate brain circuit activity over long periods of time.
Microneedle patch delivers liquid medications
Image of the Day: Artificial Snake Bite
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 6, 2019
A microneedle delivers liquid medicines through tiny, fang-like points.
Harbor seal with wearable device to track its movement
Image of the Day: Harbor Seal Wearables
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 2, 2019
External satellite transmitters fitted to the animals’ heads track their movements and habitat use.
Mouse club cells
Image of the Day: Resilient Lung Cells
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 1, 2019
A specific type of lung cell withstands flu infection by doubling down on DNA repair.
cells frozen with new cryoprotectant
Image of the Day: Frigid Cells
Nicoletta Lanese | Jul 31, 2019
A new cryoprotectant safeguards frozen cells against degradation.
artificial intelligence feature the scientist
AI Uses Images and Omics to Decode Cancer
Amber Dance | May 1, 2019
Machine learning can analyze photographs of cancer, tumor pathology slides, and genomes. Now, scientists are poised to integrate that information into cancer uber-models.
New Technique Captures Entire Fly Brain in 3D
Carolyn Wilke | Jan 18, 2019
The method combines two approaches to reveal a high-resolution map of all 40 million synapses.
Image of the Day: Eye-Opener
Sukanya Charuchandra | Jul 17, 2018
An open-source microscopy method can super-resolve live cells even under low lighting.
Image of the Day: Hold My Brood
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | May 9, 2018
Cuckoo catfish trick cichlids into caring for their eggs in a strategy known as brood parasitism.
Image of the Day: Snowflake
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Nov 30, 2017
Scientists take a close look at metal alloys that form snowflake-like structures called crystalline dendrites.
Image of the Day: Bad House Guest
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Oct 9, 2017
Parasitoid wasps inoculate other insects with their eggs, and their offspring then grow to feed on their "homes," effectively sucking the life out of their dying hosts.
Image of the Day: All Aboard
The Scientist Staff | Sep 21, 2016
This trainworm reproduces by detaching sperm- or egg-filled segments, called stolons, when it reaches maturity.