After a Lobectomy, a Boy Still Recognizes Words and Faces
After a Lobectomy, a Boy Still Recognizes Words and Faces
A longitudinal study tracking the progress of an epilepsy patient after surgery shows the brain’s ability to reorganize itself to function nearly normally.
After a Lobectomy, a Boy Still Recognizes Words and Faces
After a Lobectomy, a Boy Still Recognizes Words and Faces

A longitudinal study tracking the progress of an epilepsy patient after surgery shows the brain’s ability to reorganize itself to function nearly normally.

A longitudinal study tracking the progress of an epilepsy patient after surgery shows the brain’s ability to reorganize itself to function nearly normally.

lateralization
Like Humans, Walruses and Bats Cuddle Infants on Their Left Sides
Like Humans, Walruses and Bats Cuddle Infants on Their Left Sides
Katarina Zimmer | Jan 10, 2018
These mothers and babies keep each other in their left visual fields during maternal care, which aids right-hemisphere processing. 
Image of the Day: Right Whale or Left Whale?
Image of the Day: Right Whale or Left Whale?
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Dec 11, 2017
Scientists examine lateralized behaviors in blue whales.
The Wada Test, 1948
The Wada Test, 1948
Philip Jaekl | Nov 1, 2017
A decades-old neurological procedure developed under unique and difficult conditions in postwar Japan remains critical to the treatment of epilepsy.
Lefties, Language, and Lateralization
Lefties, Language, and Lateralization
Bob Grant | Oct 1, 2015
The long-sought genetic link between handedness and language lateralization patterns in the brain is turning out to be illusory.