Seagrass underwater on a sandy seabed.
Seagrasses Continue to Emit Methane Decades After Death
Methane production, likely achieved by a diverse group of methanogenic archaea, occurs at similar rates in both alive and dead seagrasses, a study reports. The findings highlight the potential environmental impact of seagrasses declining globally.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, ELOI_OMELLA
Seagrasses Continue to Emit Methane Decades After Death
Seagrasses Continue to Emit Methane Decades After Death

Methane production, likely achieved by a diverse group of methanogenic archaea, occurs at similar rates in both alive and dead seagrasses, a study reports. The findings highlight the potential environmental impact of seagrasses declining globally.

Methane production, likely achieved by a diverse group of methanogenic archaea, occurs at similar rates in both alive and dead seagrasses, a study reports. The findings highlight the potential environmental impact of seagrasses declining globally.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, ELOI_OMELLA

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