monkeys
Primate Brains Made to See Old Objects as New Again
Primate Brains Made to See Old Objects as New Again
Abby Olena | Aug 17, 2017
Optogenetic stimulation of the perirhinal cortex can cause macaques to process never-before seen-objects as familiar and known objects as brand new.
Image of the Day: Vessels For Days
Image of the Day: Vessels For Days
The Scientist Staff | Aug 1, 2017
A novel contrast agent made up of tiny iron oxide nanoparticles can label blood vessels, and highlight adverse events such cerebral ischemia, in dogs and monkeys. 
Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys
Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys
Ashley P. Taylor | Jul 17, 2017
In tissue samples from rhesus macaques, researchers find the virus in the same immune-privileged sites where Ebola has been found to persist in humans.
Primates Use Simple Code to Recognize Faces
Primates Use Simple Code to Recognize Faces
Abby Olena | Jun 1, 2017
Researchers could reconstruct the faces a monkey saw from the patterns of neuronal activity in a certain area of the brain.
Image of the Day: Monkey Business
Image of the Day: Monkey Business
The Scientist Staff | Jan 11, 2017
For the first time, researchers have documented interspecies sexual behavior between a male Japanese macaque and a female sika deer.
Donor Stem Cells Improve Cardiac Function
Donor Stem Cells Improve Cardiac Function
Kerry Grens | Oct 12, 2016
After a heart attack, monkeys given induced pluripotent stem cell–derived cardiomyocytes show more regeneration in the organ, but with risks.
Behavior Brief
Behavior Brief
Ben Andrew Henry | Sep 23, 2016
A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research
Silent Canopies
Silent Canopies
Jef Akst | May 1, 2016
A spate of howler monkey deaths in Nicaragua, Panama, and Ecuador has researchers scrambling to identify the cause.
Monkey See, Monkey Die
Monkey See, Monkey Die
The Scientist Staff | May 1, 2016
What's killing howler monkeys in the jungles of Central America?
Zika-Infected Monkeys in Brazil
Zika-Infected Monkeys in Brazil
Kerry Grens | Apr 28, 2016
The viral strain scientists isolated from two nonhuman primates is identical to the one circulating among humans.