A germinal center inside a lymph node
Slow Vaccine Delivery May Maximize Immune Response
A vaccine strategy involving formulation changes, an initial escalating dose, and a longer wait for booster immunization results in more-effective antibody production against HIV in rhesus monkeys, a study finds.
Slow Vaccine Delivery May Maximize Immune Response
Slow Vaccine Delivery May Maximize Immune Response

A vaccine strategy involving formulation changes, an initial escalating dose, and a longer wait for booster immunization results in more-effective antibody production against HIV in rhesus monkeys, a study finds.

A vaccine strategy involving formulation changes, an initial escalating dose, and a longer wait for booster immunization results in more-effective antibody production against HIV in rhesus monkeys, a study finds.

study story
A mouse brain showing activated neurons (white) in the brainstem 3 hours after LPS injection.
Research Pinpoints the Neurons Behind Feeling Sick
James M. Gaines | Sep 23, 2022
Specific neurons in the brainstem control sickness behaviors not directly caused by a pathogen, such as tiredness and lack of appetite, a mouse study finds.
A white deer mouse on sand surrounded by plants
Are We In the Midst of a Silent Mass Extinction?
Andy Carstens | Sep 22, 2022
A new modeling technique aims to help scientists and policymakers detect declines in genetic diversity based on habitat loss.
group of people standing on rock outcropping with ocean in distance
Repeated El Niño Events Could Spark Big Ecological Shifts
Margaret Osborne | Sep 19, 2022
Five major El Niño events per century could lead to fewer fishes that thrive in cold water and more terrestrial birds in eastern coastal ecosystems.
Illustration of pink and blue DNA molecules.
Historic Adaptations May Now Make Us Susceptible to Disease
Dan Robitzski | Sep 16, 2022
Researchers made the find using an algorithm that purportedly distinguishes between mutations that were selected for and those that came along for the ride by coincidence, a feat that has long eluded scientists.
artistic representation of jumping gene
Jumping Genes Can Cause Movement Disorder: Study
Sophie Fessl | Sep 13, 2022
Mice with overactive LINE-1 retrotransposons in their brains exhibit movement difficulties, suggesting the genetic elements may play a role in ataxia in humans. 
Illustration of a human and Neanderthal skull side by side.
Mutation Linked to Difference Between Human and Neanderthal Brains
Dan Robitzski | Sep 9, 2022
A single amino acid substitution in a protein causes increased neuron production in the frontal lobes of humans compared to Neanderthals—a tiny difference that could have given our species a cognitive edge, researchers say.
Four study participants in t shirts and shorts sit around a table in a stainless steel chamber. All four are looking at personal electronics and wearing a breathing mask connected to a nearby machine via blue tubing.
A New Culprit in Air Pollution: Reactions Triggered by Human Skin
Shafaq Zia | Sep 2, 2022
Oil on human skin reacts with ozone to produce highly reactive radicals that can generate toxic airborne chemicals in indoor spaces.
Karyotype with most chromosomes in blue, one in red and green. 
Researchers Fuse Mouse Chromosomes in Scientific First
Natalia Mesa | Aug 25, 2022
The findings will likely help elucidate the effects of chromosome fusions, which can cause disease but have also contributed to evolution.
Bright purple and orange lactobacillus bacteria.
How a Specific Gut Bacterium May Cause Type 1 Diabetes
Dan Robitzski | Aug 25, 2022
A bacterium that produces an insulin-like peptide can give mice type 1 diabetes, and infection with the microbe seems to predict the onset of the disease in humans, a study finds.
Histological slide showing cancerous prostate tissue
2D Genetic Map of Prostate Cells Charts Cancer Growth
Holly Barker | Aug 23, 2022
An in situ map of copy number variations in prostate tissue reveals that purportedly cancerous genomic changes frequently occur in the healthy tissue surrounding tumors.
A black dog with tearful eyes looks at the camera
Dogs Cry Tears of Joy: Study
Christie Wilcox | Aug 22, 2022
Pet dogs produce a larger volume of tears when they are reunited with their owners than with acquaintances, possibly because of surging oxytocin levels—findings that could be the first evidence of emotional crying in nonhuman animals.
A jar full of artificial sweetener packets.
Artificial Sweeteners Alter Gut Bacteria in Humans
Shafaq Zia | Aug 19, 2022
When consumed for as little as two weeks, common alternatives to sugar affect intestinal bacterial communities, with some reducing the body’s ability to regulate blood glucose levels, a study finds.
Scientist hunched over a lab workbench in exhaustion
Neurotransmitter Buildup May Be Why Your Brain Feels Tired
Andy Carstens | Aug 11, 2022
Performing complex cognitive tasks leads to glutamate accumulating in a key region of the brain, a study finds, which could explain why mental labor is so exhausting.
Illustration of bacteriophages infecting a bacterium
Phages Treat Gut Inflammation in Mice
Andy Carstens | Aug 4, 2022
Mixtures of viruses that attack inflammatory bowel disease–causing bacteria in mice also survive the digestive tract and are well-tolerated in humans, a study finds.
multiple generations of family members eating at outdoor table
Sun Exposure Triggers Hunger in Men but Not Women, Study Suggests
Shafaq Zia | Jul 12, 2022
Ultraviolet radiation leads to secretion of an appetite-boosting hormone in male mice, but experts say it’s not yet clear whether the mechanism applies to humans.
Close-up of the head of the Aldabra Giant Tortoise. Her face is dirty from eating grass on a sandy beach.
How Slow Can You Go?
Hannah Thomasy | Jun 23, 2022
Two studies show negligible rates of aging in some types of turtles and other cold-blooded creatures, but that doesn’t mean they’re immortal.
Illustration showing rod-shaped Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria in the lungs of a person with tuberculosis
Delayed T cell Response Allows Tuberculosis to Gain Foothold in Monkeys
Anna Napolitano | Jun 1, 2022
The results could help guide the design of new vaccines for the disease.
Variety of sweeteners - Stevia, sugar, pollen and honey stock photo
How the Gut Differentiates Artificial Sweeteners from Sugars
Chloe Tenn | Jan 21, 2022
Signals from sweeteners and sugars are relayed from the gut to the brain by different neural pathways, a new study concludes.
octopus blue
What Scientists Learned by Putting Octopuses in MRI Machines
Chloe Tenn | Jan 20, 2022
The size and complexity of cephalopod brain structures differ depending on the habitats the creatures occupy, a study finds.